EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɡɹiːt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːt

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English greten, from Old English grētan, from Proto-Germanic *grōtijaną.

VerbEdit

greet (third-person singular simple present greets, present participle greeting, simple past and past participle greeted)

  1. (transitive) To welcome in a friendly manner, either in person or through another means e.g. writing or over the phone/internet
    • 1591, William Shakespeare, Richard III, Act III, scene 1
      My lord, the mayor of London comes to greet you.
    • 1900, Charles W. Chesnutt, The House Behind the Cedars, Chapter I,
      Warwick observed, as they passed through the respectable quarter, that few people who met the girl greeted her, and that some others whom she passed at gates or doorways gave her no sign of recognition; from which he inferred that she was possibly a visitor in the town and not well acquainted.
  2. (transitive) To arrive at or reach, or meet (talking of something which brings joy)
    • 1707, Joseph Addison, Rosamond, Act I, scene 4
      In vain the spring my senses greets.
  3. (transitive) To accost; to address.
    • 1725, Alexander Pope translating Homer, Odyssey
      Fair on his feet the polish'd sandals shine,
      And thus he greets the master of the swine:
  4. (intransitive, archaic) To meet and give salutations.
  5. (transitive) To be perceived by (somebody).
    • 2013 June 8, “The new masters and commanders”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8839, page 52:
      From the ground, Colombo’s port does not look like much. Those entering it are greeted by wire fences, walls dating back to colonial times and security posts. For mariners leaving the port after lonely nights on the high seas, the delights of the B52 Night Club and Stallion Pub lie a stumble away.
    A brilliant dawn greeted her eyes as she looked out of the window.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English greet, grete (great).

AdjectiveEdit

greet (comparative more greet, superlative most greet)

  1. (obsolete outside Scotland) Great.

Etymology 3Edit

From a blend of two Old English verbs, grētan, grǣtan (itself from Proto-Germanic *grētaną); and of Old English grēotan (itself from Proto-Germanic *greutaną), both meaning "to weep, lament".

VerbEdit

greet (third-person singular simple present greets, present participle greeting, simple past and past participle greeted or grat or grutten)

  1. (Scotland, Northern England) To weep; to cry.
    • 1933, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Cloud Howe, Polygon 2006 (A Scots Quair), page 312:
      And damn't! if he didn't take down her bit things and scone her so sore she grat like a bairn [...].
    • 2008, James Kelman, Kieron Smith, Boy, Penguin 2009, page 2:
      My maw went potty and started greeting.

Related termsEdit

NounEdit

greet (uncountable)

  1. (obsolete) Mourning, weeping, lamentation.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English grēat, in turn from Proto-Germanic *grautaz.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

greet (plural and weak singular greete, comparative greter, superlative gretest)

  1. great (large, significant)

DescendantsEdit

  • English: great
    • Welsh: grêt
  • Scots: great, greet, grete, greit

ScotsEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From a blend of two Old English verbs, grētan (cognate with Swedish gråta', Danish græde) and grēotan (of uncertain ultimate origin), both ‘weep, lament’.

VerbEdit

greet (third-person singular present greets, present participle greetin, past grat or grettit, past participle grutten)

  1. to weep, lament
    • 2008, Gordon Jarvie, Scottish Folk and Fairy Tales from Burns to Buchan, Penguin UK, →ISBN:
      Then Sandy jumpit oot the boat, an he ran an ran greetin an sobbin an sobbin an greetin. An when he ran up tae the fairm, this ceilidh's still gaun on, see? an the pot o sowens is still on the fire! An he cam in howlin an greetin an sobbin, an the laird says tae him, ‘Whit's adae wi ye, Sandy?
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    • 2013, Donal McLaughlin, transl., Naw Much of a Talker, Freight Books, translation of Der Goalie bin ig by Pedro Lenz, page 5:
      Thinking o Regula hid me greetin aw ae a sudden.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

NounEdit

greet (uncountable)

  1. cry, lamentation

Etymology 2Edit

AdjectiveEdit

greet (comparative greeter, superlative greetest)

  1. Alternative form of great