See also: hẹp and нер

English edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /hɛp/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛp

Etymology 1 edit

Shortening.

Noun edit

hep (uncountable)

  1. (informal) hepatitis.
  2. Abbreviation of high-energy physics.
Usage notes edit

Etymology 2 edit

Alteration of hip.

Noun edit

hep (plural heps)

  1. (obsolete) A hip of a rose; a rosehip.

Etymology 3 edit

US slang of unknown or disputed origin, first recorded 1903.[1] Robert Gold suggested that it is a variant of hip, from white jazz fans’ mishearing African American musicians.[2] Jonathon Green suggests a connection to a 19th century interjection used to drive horses;[3] compare gee up.

Adjective edit

hep (comparative more hep, superlative most hep)

  1. (dated slang) Aware, up-to-date.
    • 1960, P. G. Wodehouse, Jeeves in the Offing, chapter IX:
      I was pleased, as I put him hep on the Wilbert-Phyllis situation and revealed the part he was expected to play in it, to note that he showed no signs of being about to issue the presidential veto.
  2. (dated slang) Cool, hip, sophisticated.
    • 1964 [1957], Colin MacInnes, City of Spades, London: Penguin Books, page 59:
      And I was struck to notice that though the band was only Jumble imitation of our style, it was quite a hep combination, with some feel of the beat, not like those dreadful records of the English bands I'd heard back home which never can play slow, and never can play easy to the limbs.
Derived terms edit

Verb edit

hep (third-person singular simple present heps, present participle hepping, simple past and past participle hepped)

  1. (dated, US slang) To make aware of.
    I hepped him to the situation.

Etymology 4 edit

Interjection edit

hep

  1. Alternative form of hup (part of marching cadence)
    Hep, two, three four! Hep, two, three four!

Etymology 5 edit

From German hep or Hepp-Hepp, an interjection used to attack Jewish people. The origin of the German source is unknown, but may come from a goatherd’s call.[4]

 
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Interjection edit

hep

  1. (historical) A rallying cry in attacks on the Jewish people.
    • 1893, Emanuel Schreiber, Historians of Judaism in the Nineteenth Century[1], page 13:
      Let us hope that the modern “Hep-Hep” cry of Antisemitism of to-day will be accompanied by a similar level of Judaism.

References edit

  1. ^ hep, adj.”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2018.
  2. ^ Robert S. Gold (1964) A Jazz Lexicon, →OCLC
  3. ^ Jonathon Green (2024) “hep adj.”, in Green’s Dictionary of Slang
  4. ^ hep, n.1 and int.”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2018.

See also edit

Anagrams edit

Albanian edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Albanian *skapa, related to hap.[1]

Noun edit

hep f (plural hepa, definite hepi, definite plural hepat)

  1. furrow, scratch

Related terms edit

References edit

  1. ^ Orel, Vladimir E. (1998) “hep”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden, Boston, Köln: Brill, →ISBN, page 145

Breton edit

Etymology edit

From Middle Breton hep, from Old Breton ep, from Proto-Brythonic *heb, from Proto-Celtic *sekʷo-, from Proto-Indo-European *sekʷ- (follow). Cognate to Welsh heb.

Pronunciation edit

Preposition edit

hep

  1. without

Inflection edit

Finnish edit

Etymology edit

Perhaps originally used with horses (in the sense "giddyup"), in which case possibly a shortening of hepo; compare also hop.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈhep/, [ˈhe̞p]
  • Rhymes: -ep
  • Syllabification(key): hep

Interjection edit

hep! (colloquial)

  1. go! (in ready, set, go)
  2. used as a generic interjection to express desire or surprise or to attract attention to what is said after

Further reading edit

Turkish edit

Etymology edit

From Ottoman Turkish هپ (hep).

Pronunciation edit

Adverb edit

hep

  1. altogether
  2. always

Usage notes edit

This adverb can function as a pronoun, taking several possessive forms: hepimiz (all of us), hepiniz (all of you), and, irregularly, for the third person singular, hepsi (all of it). These forms may then also take case endings, just like regular pronouns.

Related terms edit

References edit