See also: HAP, háp, hấp, håp, hạp, and нар

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /hæp/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æp

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English hap, happe (chance, hap, luck, fortune), from Old Norse happ (hap, chance, good luck), from Proto-Germanic *hampą (convenience, happiness), from Proto-Indo-European *kob- (good fortune, prophecy; to bend, bow, fit in, work, succeed). Cognate with Icelandic happ (hap, chance, good luck). Related also to Icelandic heppinn (lucky, fortunate, happy), Old Danish hap (fortunate), Old English ġehæp (fit, convenient), Swedish hampa (to turn out), Old Church Slavonic кобь (kobĭ, fate), Old Irish cob (victory).

The verb is from Middle English happen, from Old Norse *happa, *heppa, from Proto-Germanic *hampijaną (to fit in, be fitting), from the noun. Cognate with Old Danish happe (to chance, happen), Norwegian heppa (to occur, happen).

NounEdit

hap (plural haps)

  1. (slang, in the plural) Happenings; events; goings-on.
    • 2018, Something Fishy (Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs: The Series):
      Katie Griffin as Samantha Sparks: "Hey, Flint. I heard your extended (gasp) earlier. What's the haps?"
      Mark Edwards as Flint Lockwood: "The haps is -- you're not going to believe this, but dad asked me to make him an invention!"
  2. (archaic) That which happens; an occurrence or happening, especially an unexpected, random, chance, or fortuitous event; chance; fortune; luck.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

hap (third-person singular simple present haps, present participle happing, simple past and past participle happed)

  1. (intransitive, literary) To happen; to befall; to chance.
    Synonyms: come to pass, occur, transpire; see also Thesaurus:happen
    • 1868-9, Robert Browning, “The Ring and the Book”, in Edward Berdoe, editor, The poetical works of Robert Browning, published 1889, page 17:
      "But laudably, since thus it happed!" quoth one: Whereat, more witness and the case postponed. "Thus it happed not, since thus he did the deed,....
  2. (transitive, literary) To happen to.
    • 1891, Elizabeth Stoddard, “No Answer”, in Harper's magazine, page 55:
      What meaneth June, to hap us every year.

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English hap.

NounEdit

hap (plural haps)

  1. (Britain, Scotland, Western Pennsylvania, dialect) A wrap, such as a quilt or a comforter. Also, a small or folded blanket placed on the end of a bed to keep feet warm.

VerbEdit

hap (third-person singular simple present haps, present participle happing, simple past and past participle happed)

  1. (dialect) To wrap, clothe.
    • (Can we date this quote by Dr. J. Brown and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      The surgeon happed her up carefully.
    • 1899, “Bartonshill Coal Co. v. Beid, 1 Pat. Sc. App. 792, 793.”, in Robert Campbell, editor, Ruling cases, volume 19:
      The practice was, before firing a shot for the purpose of blasting, to give an order to hap the crane, that is, to cover it, in order to protect it from the effect of the shot.

Etymology 3Edit

Shortening of Haplochromis

NounEdit

hap (plural haps)

  1. Any of the cichlid fishes of the tribe Haplochromini.

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Albanian *skapa, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kep- (to cut, split, dig). Compare English shape, German schaffen (make, create). Alternatively from Proto-Indo-European *upo (up from under, over). Compare Low German apen, Icelandic opna, Norwegian åpne (to open), English open.

VerbEdit

hap (first-person singular past tense hapa, participle hapur)

  1. to open
    Synonym: çel

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

hap m (plural happen, diminutive hapje n)

  1. (often diminutive) bite
    De hond nam er een hap van.
    The dog took a bite of it.
  2. chunk
  3. (often diminutive) snack, light meal
    Ik heb wel trek in een warme hap.
    I would certainly like a warm meal.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

VerbEdit

hap

  1. first-person singular present indicative of happen
  2. imperative of happen

IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Onomatopoeic

NounEdit

hap m (genitive singular hap, nominative plural hapanna)

  1. hop
  2. blow

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit

  • "hap" in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Entries containing “hap” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

SeriEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hap (plural hap)

  1. deer

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Moser, Mary B.; Marlett, Stephen A. (2010) Comcaac quih yaza quih hant ihiip hac: cmiique iitom - cocsar iitom - maricaana iitom [Seri-Spanish-English Dictionary], 2nd edition, Hermosillo: Plaza y Valdés Editores, →ISBN, page 334.

Tok PisinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English half.

NounEdit

hap

  1. half
    • 1989, Buk Baibel long Tok Pisin, Port Moresby: Bible Society of Papua New Guinea, 1:6:
      Bihain God i tok olsem, “Wanpela banis i mas kamap bilong banisim wara, bai wara i stap long tupela hap.” Orait dispela banis i kamap. God i mekim dispela banis i kamap bilong banisim wara antap na wara daunbilo.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
  2. part
    • 1989, Buk Baibel long Tok Pisin, Port Moresby: Bible Society of Papua New Guinea, 2:21:
      Orait God, Bikpela i mekim man i slip i dai tru. Na taim man i slip yet, God i kisim wanpela bun long banis bilong man na i pasim gen skin bilong dispela hap.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
  3. place, one of a few places
    • 1989, Buk Baibel long Tok Pisin, Port Moresby: Bible Society of Papua New Guinea, 1:22:
      Na God i mekim gutpela tok bilong givim strong long ol. Em i tokim ol olsem, “Yupela ol kain kain samting bilong solwara, yupela i mas kamap planti na pulapim olgeta hap bilong solwara. Na yupela ol pisin, yupela i mas kamap planti long graun.”
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

AdverbEdit

hap

  1. there

Derived termsEdit

This entry has fewer than three known examples of actual usage, the minimum considered necessary for clear attestation, and may not be reliable. Tok Pisin is subject to a special exemption for languages with limited documentation. If you speak it, please consider editing this entry or adding citations. See also Help and the Community Portal.

TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Arabic حَبّ(ḥabb, grains, seeds, pills).

NounEdit

hap (definite accusative habı, plural haplar)

  1. pill

DeclensionEdit

Inflection
Nominative hap
Definite accusative hapı
Singular Plural
Nominative hap haplar
Definite accusative hapı hapları
Dative hapa haplara
Locative hapta haplarda
Ablative haptan haplardan
Genitive hapın hapların

DescendantsEdit

  • Greek: χάπι (chápi, pill)