See also: Holm, hõlm, and ħolm

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English holm, holme, from Old English holm (wave, ocean, water, sea, islet) and Old Norse holmr, holmi (islet), both from the Proto-Germanic *hulmaz (rising ground, hill, island), from Proto-Indo-European root *kelH- (to rise, be elevated, be prominent; hill). Cognate with Old Saxon holm, Old Danish hulm, Middle Low German holm, German Holm, Middle Dutch holm, Swedish holme, Norwegian Bokmål holme, Icelandic hólmur.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

holm (plural holms)

 
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  1. Small island, islet.
  2. An island in a lake, river or estuary; an eyot.
  3. (dialect, chiefly West Yorkshire(?), Scotland, Orkney) Any small island, but especially one near a larger island or the mainland, sometimes with holly bushes; an islet. Often the word is used in Norse-influenced place-names. See also holme.
  4. Rich flat land near a river, prone to being completely flooded; a river-meadow; bottomland.

TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English holm, holme, alteration of Middle English holin (holly). Doublet of hollin and holly.

NounEdit

holm (plural holms)

  1. (obsolete outside dialects) The holly.
    1590, Edmund Spenser, chapter 1, in The Faerie Queen[1], page 1:
    The fruitful olive, and the plantane round;
    The carver holm; the maple, seldom inward sound.
  2. A common evergreen oak of Europe, Quercus ilex; the holm oak.
Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse holmr, from Proto-Germanic *hulmaz.

NounEdit

holm c (singular definite holmen, plural indefinite holme)

  1. a small island

InflectionEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch and Old Dutch holm, ultimately from Proto-West Germanic *holm (hill, rise).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

holm m (plural holmen, diminutive holmpje n)

  1. a small island

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *holm (island), though the meaning was influenced by Old Norse holmr.

Cognate with Old Saxon holm (German Holm), Old Dutch holm (Dutch holm); also Latin culmen (peak); compare culminate.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

holm m (nominative plural holmas)

  1. (poetic) ocean, sea, waters
    Ða wæs heofonweardes gast ofer holm boren.
    The spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters.

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle English: holm, holme

PolishEdit

 
holm
 
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Chemical element
Ho
Previous: dysproz (Dy)
Next: erb (Er)

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /xɔlm/
  • (file)

NounEdit

holm m inan

  1. holmium (chemical element, Ho, atomic number 67)

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit

  • holm in Polish dictionaries at PWN

SloveneEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *xъlmъ.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /xòːlm/, /xóːlm/

NounEdit

họ̄lm m inan

  1. hill

InflectionEdit

Masculine inan., hard o-stem
nom. sing. hólm
gen. sing. hólma
singular dual plural
nominative hólm hólma hólmi
accusative hólm hólma hólme
genitive hólma hólmov hólmov
dative hólmu hólmoma hólmom
locative hólmu hólmih hólmih
instrumental hólmom hólmoma hólmi

Further readingEdit

  • holm”, in Slovarji Inštituta za slovenski jezik Frana Ramovša ZRC SAZU, portal Fran

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *hulmaz. Cognate with Old Norse holmr, Icelandic hólmur, Old Church Slavonic хлъмъ (xlŭmŭ).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

holm n

  1. islet (especially nearby river or mainland)

DeclensionEdit

Declension of holm 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative holm holmen holmar holmarna
Genitive holms holmens holmars holmarnas

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit