Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English kindel, from Old English cynd.

VerbEdit

kindle ‎(third-person singular simple present kindles, present participle kindling, simple past and past participle kindled)

  1. (intransitive, of a rabbit or hare) To bring forth young; to give birth.
    • 2014, Karen Patry, The Rabbit-Raising Problem Solver, Storey Publishing (ISBN 9781612124667), page 146
      If she kindled and lost just a few kits and is not bony over her back and hind end, you can rebreed immediately. If she kindled a large litter (more than, say, eight kits), you may wish to wait a week or two before rebreeding so that she can  ...
    • Holland
      The poor beast had but lately kindled.

NounEdit

kindle ‎(plural kindles)

  1. (rare, collective) A group of kittens.
    A kindle of kittens.
HypernymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English kindlen, from Old Norse kynda(to inflame), from Proto-Germanic *kundijaną.

VerbEdit

kindle ‎(third-person singular simple present kindles, present participle kindling, simple past and past participle kindled)

  1. (transitive) To start (a fire) or light (a torch, a match, coals, etc.).
    • 1841, Ancient Laws and Institutes of Wales, page 336:
      If a person kindle a fire in the house of another person, let him pay for the house to the owner, if it be burned.
    • 1898, J. Meade Falkner, Moonfleet Chapter 4
      And then it was that I first perceived the danger in which I stood; for there was no hope of kindling a light, and I doubted now whether even in the light I could ever have done much to dislodge the great slab of slate.
    • 2013 July-August, Henry Petroski, “Geothermal Energy”, in American Scientist, volume 101, number 4:
      Energy has seldom been found where we need it when we want it. Ancient nomads, wishing to ward off the evening chill and enjoy a meal around a campfire, had to collect wood and then spend time and effort coaxing the heat of friction out from between sticks to kindle a flame.
  2. (transitive, figuratively) To arouse or inspire (a passion, etc).
    He kindled an enthusiasm for the project in his fellow workers.
  3. (intransitive, figuratively) To begin to grow or take hold.
SynonymsEdit
AntonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit