indicative

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (abbreviation, grammar): ind.

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French indicatif, from Late Latin indicātīvus.

PronunciationEdit

  • (US) IPA(key): /ɪnˈdɪk.ə.tɪv/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

indicative (comparative more indicative, superlative most indicative)

  1. serving as a sign, indication or suggestion of something
    He had pains indicative of a heart attack.
  2. (grammar) of, or relating to the indicative mood

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

indicative (countable and uncountable, plural indicatives)

  1. (grammar, uncountable) The indicative mood.
  2. (grammar, countable) A term in the indicative mood.
    • 2018, James Lambert, “Anglo-Indian slang in dictionaries on historical principles”, in World Englishes, volume 37, page 253:
      The fact that imperative forms were taken into English as indicatives suggests that the English speakers using the Hindustani verbs were most familiar (in some cases perhaps only familiar) with the imperative form.

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

indicative

  1. feminine singular of indicatif

ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

indicative

  1. feminine plural of indicativo

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

indicātīve

  1. vocative masculine singular of indicātīvus