jerk off

See also: jerkoff and jerk-off

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

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VerbEdit

jerk off (third-person singular simple present jerks off, present participle jerking off, simple past and past participle jerked off) (chiefly US)

  1. (dated) Used other than with a figurative or idiomatic meaning: see jerk,‎ off.
    • 1884, Ohio State Horticultural Society, Seventeenth annual report of the Ohio State Horticultural Society for the year 1883-84, page 32:
      I climb up in my trees myself, and jerk off the suckers in the trees.
    • 1896, California Superior Courts, Colorado Supreme Court, Kansas Supreme Court, et al, The Pacific reporter, page 265:
      The conductor and the head brakeman testified that they gave no order to Roy Wilson or any one else to jerk off or pull off young Mitchell from the train.
  2. (idiomatic, slang) To masturbate, usually a male.
    • 1999, John Stoltenberg, The end of manhood: parables on sex and selfhood, page 245:
      But to learn to love manhood, sooner or later you have to learn to jerk off in one particular way, to the exclusion of some other possible ways.
  3. (intransitive, vulgar) To do nothing; to waste time.
    Stop jerking off. We've got a deadline.
  4. (transitive, vulgar) To deceive.
    He was jerking us all off about how advanced the project was.

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NounEdit

jerk off (countable and uncountable, plural jerk offs)

  1. (vulgar, countable, slang, US) An annoying person.
  2. (vulgar, uncountable, US) An act of masturbation. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  3. (film) A stunt in which the performer is suddenly pulled off a horse, etc. by means of a cable.
    • 2014, Gene Scott Freese, Hollywood Stunt Performers, 1910s-1970s:
      He became one of the industry's top horsemen, specializing in Running Ws, pit falls, and cable jerk-offs.