See also: Stunt

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /stʌnt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌnt

Etymology 1Edit

Unknown. Compare Middle Low German stunt (a shoulder grip with which you throw someone on their back), Middle English stunt (foolish; stupid).

NounEdit

stunt (plural stunts)

  1. A daring or dangerous feat, often involving the display of gymnastic skills.
    • 2017 December 1, Tom Breihan, “Mad Max: Fury Road might already be the best action movie ever made”, in The Onion AV Club[1]:
      He found ways to devise, stage, and film stunts that are like nothing anyone’s ever accomplished. He recorded stunning image after stunning image; practically every frame of Fury Road could be a painting.
  2. (archaic) skill
    • 1912, Stratemeyer Syndicate, Baseball Joe on the School Nine Chapter 1
      "See if you can hit the barrel, Joe," urged George Bland. "A lot of us have missed it, including Peaches, who seems to think his particular stunt is high throwing."
  3. (American football) A special means of rushing the quarterback done to confuse the opposing team's offensive line.
HyponymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Danish: stunt
  • German: Stunt
  • Norwegian Bokmål: stunt
  • Norwegian Nynorsk: stunt
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

stunt (third-person singular simple present stunts, present participle stunting, simple past and past participle stunted)

  1. (intransitive, cheerleading) To perform a stunt.
  2. (intransitive, slang, African-American Vernacular) To show off; to posture.
    • 2005, Jordan Houston, Darnell Carlton, Paul Beauregard, Premro Smith, Marlon Goodwin, David Brown, and Willie Hutchinson (lyrics), “Stay Fly”, in Most Known Unknown[2], Sony BMG, performed by Three 6 Mafia (featuring Young Buck, 8 Ball, and MJG):
      Call me the juice and you know I'm a stunt.
    • 2015, Seth Turner Jr., Brother: The Self-made Story of a St. Louis Entrepreneur:
      I was that interested because I wanted the Z28, but I wasn't going another day with Sterling stunting on me with the Contour.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From dialectal stunt (stubborn, dwarfed), from Middle English stont, stunt (short, brief), from Old English stunt (stupid, foolish, simple), from Proto-Germanic *stuntaz (short, compact, stupid, dull). Cognate with Middle High German stunz (short), Old Norse stuttr (short in stature, dwarfed). Related to Old English styntan (to make dull, stupefy, become dull, repress). More at stint.

VerbEdit

stunt (third-person singular simple present stunts, present participle stunting, simple past and past participle stunted)

  1. (transitive) To check or hinder the growth or development of.
    Some have said smoking stunts your growth.
    The politician timed his announcement to stunt any surge in the polls his opponent might gain from the convention.
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

stunt (plural stunts)

  1. A check in growth.
  2. That which has been checked in growth; a stunted animal or thing.
  3. A two-year-old whale, which, having been weaned, is lean and yields little blubber.

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

stunt m (plural stunts, diminutive stuntje n)

  1. stunt

VerbEdit

stunt

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of stunten
  2. imperative of stunten

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

stunt

  1. Alternative form of stound: various spans of time.

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From English stunt.

NounEdit

stunt n (definite singular stuntet, indefinite plural stunt, definite plural stunta or stuntene)

  1. a stunt

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English stunt.

NounEdit

stunt n (definite singular stuntet, indefinite plural stunt, definite plural stunta)

  1. a stunt

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *stuntaz (short, stunted; stupid).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

stunt

  1. stupid, foolish
  2. (substantive) idiot, fool

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

DescendantsEdit