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EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From obsolete Dutch gijben (now gijpen), itself of obscure origin. More at jib

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

jibe (plural jibes)

  1. (nautical) A manoeuver in which the stern of a sailing boat or ship crosses the wind, typically resulting in the sudden sweep of the boom from one side of the sailboat to the other.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

jibe (third-person singular simple present jibes, present participle jibing, simple past and past participle jibed)

  1. (intransitive, nautical) To perform a jibe
    • 1719, Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe, London: W. Taylor, 3rd edition, p. 271,[1]
      [] I had my Man Friday to teach as to what belong’d to the Navigation of my Boat; for though he knew very well how to paddle a Canoe, he knew nothing what belong’d to a Sail and a Rudder, and was the most amaz’d when he saw me work the Boat too and again in the Sea by the Rudder, and how the Sail gyb’d, and fill’d this Way or that Way, as the Course we sail’d chang’d []
  2. (transitive, nautical) To cause to execute a jibe
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Origin unknown.

VerbEdit

jibe (third-person singular simple present jibes, present participle jibing, simple past and past participle jibed)

  1. (intransitive) To agree.
    That explanation doesn't jibe with the facts.

Usage notesEdit

"Jibe" and "jive" have been used interchangeably in the U.S. to indicate the concept "to agree or accord." While one recent dictionary accepts this usage of "jive," most sources consider it to be in error.

TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Probably from Old French giber, to handle roughly.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

jibe (plural jibes)

  1. A facetious or insulting remark, a jeer or taunt.
    • c. 1600, William Shakespeare, Hamlet, Act V, Scene 1,[2]
      Where be your gibes now? your gambols? your songs? your flashes of merriment that were wont to set the table on a roar? Not one now, to mock your own grinning?
    • 1746, Charles Macklin, King Henry the VII: Or the Popish Impostor. A Tragedy, London: R. Francklin et al., Act II, p. 24,[3]
      [] Come, come, we
      All are Friends, nor have we Time for Jibe,
      Or Anger now, but 'gainst our common Foes,
      The French and Scot; there let your Pray’rs, and Jests,
      And Blows, be levell’d.
    • 1862, Christina Rossetti, “Goblin Market” in Goblin Market and Other Poems, London: Macmillan, pp. 24-25,[4]
      She ran and ran
      As if she feared some goblin man
      Dogged her with gibe or curse
      Or something worse:
    • 1903, W. E. B. Du Bois, The Souls of Black Folk, Chapter 12,[5]
      He bent to all the gibes and prejudices, to all hatred and discrimination, with that rare courtesy which is the armor of pure souls.
    • 1920, F. Scott Fitzgerald, This Side of Paradise, Book One, Chapter 1,[6]
      He had written two novels: one of them violently anti-Catholic, just before his conversion, and five years later another, in which he had attempted to turn all his clever jibes against Catholics into even cleverer innuendoes against Episcopalians.
    He flung subtle jibes at her until she couldn't bear to work with him any longer.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

jibe (third-person singular simple present jibes, present participle jibing, simple past and past participle jibed)

  1. (intransitive) To make a mocking remark or remarks, jeer.
    • c. 1594, William Shakespeare, Love’s Labour’s Lost, Act V, Scene 2,[7]
      Why, that’s the way to choke a gibing spirit,
      Whose influence is begot of that loose grace
      Which shallow laughing hearers give to fools:
    • 1722, Daniel Defoe, Moll Flanders, London: W. Chetwood & T. Edling, p. 7,[8]
      This set the old Gentlewoman a Laughing at me, as you may be sure it would: Well, Madam forsooth, says she, Gibing at me, you would be a Gentlewoman, and pray how will you come to be a Gentlewoman? what, will you do it by your Fingers Ends?
    • 1928, Radclyffe Hall, The Well of Loneliness, Book Two, Chapter 27,[9]
      But now her mother was speaking again: ‘And this—read this and tell me if you wrote it, or if that man’s lying.’ And Stephen must read her own misery jibing at her from those pages in Ralph Crossby’s stiff and clerical handwriting.
  2. (transitive) To mock, taunt.
    • c. 1606, William Shakespeare, Antony and Cleopatra, Act II, Scene 2,[10]
      [] you
      Did pocket up my letters, and with taunts
      Did gibe my missive out of audience.
    • 1714, John Arbuthnot, A Farther Continuation of the History of the Crown-Inn, London: J. Moor, Part III, p. 15,[11]
      We could hardly speak before for fear of our Taskmasters; but we dare now Nose those Villains that used to gibe us.
  3. (transitive) To say in a mocking or taunting manner.
    • 1936, Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind, Part One, Chapter 6,[12]
      “Eavesdroppers often hear highly instructive things,” jibed a memory.
    • 1953, James Hilton, Time and Time Again, Paris III,[13]
      ‘What’s the matter with you?’ the woman jibed. She called after him as he walked away: 'Nuts, that's what you are!’
Derived termsEdit