EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Probably from Dutch gijben (obsolete), gijpen; cognate with Danish gibbe, German gieben, giepen, Swedish gipa, gippa.[1]

The noun is derived from the verb; compare Dutch gjib (obsolete), gjip (act of gybing; a boom).[2]

VerbEdit

gybe (third-person singular simple present gybes, present participle gybing, simple past and past participle gybed)

  1. (transitive, nautical) To shift a fore-and-aft sail from one side of a sailing vessel to the other, while sailing before the wind.
  2. (intransitive, nautical) Of a fore-and-aft sail or its boom: to shift, often forcefully and suddenly, from one side of a sailing vessel to the other.
    • 1719 April 25, [Daniel Defoe], The Life and Strange Surprizing Adventures of Robinson Crusoe, [], 3rd edition, London: [] W[illiam] Taylor [], published 1719, OCLC 838630407, page 271:
      [] I had my Man Friday to teach as to what belong'd to the Navigation of my Boat; for though he knew very well how to paddle a Canoe, he knew nothing what belong'd to a Sail and a Rudder, and was the moſt amaz'd when he ſaw me work the Boat too and again in the Sea by the Rudder, and how the Sail gyb'd, and fill'd this Way or that Way, as the Courſe we ſail'd chang'd: []
  3. (intransitive, nautical) Generally of a small sailing vessel: to change tack with the wind crossing behind the vessel.
  4. (by extension, obsolete) Often as gybe at: to balk, hesitate, or vacillate when faced with a course of action, plan, or proposal.
Usage notesEdit

Sense 3 (“to change tack”) is generally used of boats and other small sailing craft; the corresponding manoeuvre in a sailing ship is wear.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

gybe (plural gybes)

  1. (nautical) The act of gybing.
    1. A sudden shift of a sail's angle, or a sudden change in the direction that a vessel is sailing in.
    2. A manoeuvre in which the stern of a sailing vessel crosses the wind, typically resulting in the forceful and sudden sweep of the boom from one side of the vessel to the other.
      • 2014, Tim Davison, “Symmetric Spinnakers”, in Skipper’s Cockpit Racing Guide: For Dinghies, Keelboats and Yachts, London: Adlard Coles Nautical, →ISBN, page 24:
        The key to a good gybe is to bring the spinnaker round to the old weather side before you begin, and then to steer to keep some wind in the kite.
  2. (by extension) A sudden change in approach or direction; vacillation.
TranslationsEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See jibe.

NounEdit

gybe (plural gybes)

  1. Alternative spelling of jibe (taunt)

VerbEdit

gybe (third-person singular simple present gybes, present participle gybing, simple past and past participle gybed)

  1. Alternative spelling of jibe (taunt)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ gybe, v.”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, 1900
  2. ^ gybe, n.2”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, 1900

AnagramsEdit