reproach

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old French reprochier (Modern reprocher).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

reproach ‎(plural reproaches)

  1. A mild rebuke, or an implied criticism.
    • 1818, Mary Shelley, chapter 4, in Frankenstein[1]:
      My father made no reproach in his letters and only took notice of my science by inquiring into my occupations more particularly than before.
  2. Disgrace or shame.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

reproach ‎(third-person singular simple present reproaches, present participle reproaching, simple past and past participle reproached)

  1. To criticize or rebuke someone.
    • Bible, 1 Peter iv. 14
      if ye be reproached for the name of Christ
    • Milton
      That this newcomer, Shame, / There sit not, and reproach us as unclean.
    • Dryden
      Mezentius [] with his ardour warmed / His fainting friends, reproached their shameful flight, / Repelled the victors.
  2. To disgrace, or bring shame upon someone.
    • Shakespeare
      I thought your marriage fit; else imputation, / For that he knew you, might reproach your life.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Read in another language