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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old French reprochier (Modern reprocher).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɹɪˈpɹəʊtʃ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ɹɪˈpɹoʊtʃ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -əʊtʃ

NounEdit

reproach (plural reproaches)

  1. A mild rebuke, or an implied criticism.
    • 1818, Mary Shelley, chapter 4, in Frankenstein[1]:
      My father made no reproach in his letters and only took notice of my science by inquiring into my occupations more particularly than before.
  2. Disgrace or shame.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

reproach (third-person singular simple present reproaches, present participle reproaching, simple past and past participle reproached)

  1. To criticize or rebuke someone.
    • Bible, 1 Peter iv. 14
      if ye be reproached for the name of Christ
    • (Can we date this quote?) John Milton
      That this newcomer, Shame, / There sit not, and reproach us as unclean.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Dryden
      Mezentius [] with his ardour warmed / His fainting friends, reproached their shameful flight, / Repelled the victors.
  2. To disgrace, or bring shame upon someone.
    • (Can we date this quote?) William Shakespeare
      I thought your marriage fit; else imputation, / For that he knew you, might reproach your life.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit