EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Perhaps from Middle English flouten (to play the flute); compare with Dutch fluiten.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /flaʊt/
    • (file)
  • (Canada) IPA(key): /flʌʊt/
  • Rhymes: -aʊt

VerbEdit

flout (third-person singular simple present flouts, present participle flouting, simple past and past participle flouted)

  1. (transitive) To express contempt for (laws, rules, etc.) by word or action.
    • 2012, The Economist, Sep 29th 2012 issue, Tax alchemy: Tech's avoidance
      The manoeuvres of Microsoft and HP appear to comply with the letter of the regulations, even if they flout their spirit.
  2. (transitive, archaic) To scorn.

Usage notesEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

flout (plural flouts)

  1. The act by which something is flouted; violation of a law.
    • 2012, John Flowerdew, Discourse in English Language Education (page 97)
      A flout is when someone deliberately and ostentatiously contravenes a maxim.
  2. A mockery or insult.

LuxembourgishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

flout

  1. strong/weak nominative/accusative neuter singular of flou