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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Japanese 可愛い, かわいい (kawaii, lovable, adorable; cute).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

kawaii (comparative more kawaii, superlative most kawaii)

  1. (chiefly in the context of Japanese culture) Cute, adorable.
    • 2010, Susan Cahill, Emma Hegarty, Emilie Moran, Waste and Abundance: The Measure of Consumption: Special Issue of SubStance, Issue 116, 37:2 (2008), Univ of Wisconsin Press (ISBN 9780299238230), page 106
      However, Wong's connection to kawaii culture, which I have attempted to establish here, suggests a different reading of his films. As Larissa Hjorth has argued, “The kawaii is not about post-humanism but rather a clear demonstration of neo-humanist types” (144). In this sense, East Asian kawaii culture, like Wong's films, should be understood as desperate attempts to create a dreamlike humanist space within the harsh reality of globalized capitalism.
    • 2010, Josef Steiff, Tristan D. Tamplin, Anime and Philosophy: Wide Eyed Wonder, Open Court (ISBN 9780812697131)
      The female has been reduced to a manageable, nonthreatening form. As we've mentioned, the cyborgs are depicted with typically kawaii features, such as disproportionately large eyes and heads, and thin bodies. Each girl is dressed by her handler in keeping with a particular style. For example, Triela often wears a masculine pants suit []
    • 2016, Gavriel Salvendy, Waldemar Karwowski, Advances in Cognitive Ergonomics, CRC Press (ISBN 9781439834923), page 136
      In the advanced information society of the 21st century with its communication infrastructure of computers and networks, it is crucial to enhance software that utilizes these technologies, that is, digital content. Among such content, various Japanese kawaii characters such as Hello Kitty and Pokemon have become []

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

kawaii (uncountable)

  1. (chiefly in the context of Japanese culture) The quality of being kawaii; cuteness.
    Synonyms: kawaiiness
    • 2010, Susan Cahill, Emma Hegarty, Emilie Moran, Waste and Abundance: The Measure of Consumption: Special Issue of SubStance, Issue 116, 37:2 (2008), Univ of Wisconsin Press (ISBN 9780299238230), page 106
      However, Wong's connection to kawaii culture, which I have attempted to establish here, suggests a different reading of his films. As Larissa Hjorth has argued, “The kawaii is not about post-humanism but rather a clear demonstration of neo-humanist types” (144). In this sense, East Asian kawaii culture, like Wong's films, should be understood as desperate attempts to create a dreamlike humanist space within the harsh reality of globalized capitalism.
    • 2014, Anthony Elliott, Masataka Katagiri, Atsushi Sawai, Routledge Companion to Contemporary Japanese Social Theory: From Individualization to Globalization in Japan Today, Routledge (ISBN 9781317580515)
      Inmates had simply to surrender in fear of a future of simply waiting for death. However, it is not possible to achieve a full understanding of the significance of kawaii in modern society if we fixate only on the disquieting power hiding in the shadows of kawaii things.
  2. Cute items, especially from Japan.

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

kawaii

  1. Rōmaji transcription of かわいい

PortugueseEdit

AdjectiveEdit

kawaii (plural kawaii, comparable)

  1. kawaii (cute, in context of Japanese culture)