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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Attested since at least the 1830s in a variety of spellings such as kibbosh and kye-bosk,[1] of unclear origin. Proposals include:

Compare bosh (nonsense).

PronunciationEdit

  • (GenAM) IPA(key): [ˈkaɪˌbɑʃ], IPA(key): [kaɪˈbɑʃ], or IPA(key): [kɪˈbɑʃ]
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɒʃ

NounEdit

kibosh (uncountable)

  1. (slang) A checking or restraining element. Only used in put the kibosh on.
  2. (slang, dated) Nonsense, bosh. [19th c.]
    • 1835/36, Charles Dickens, Sketches by Boz, "Seven Dials":
      'What do you mean by hussies?' interrupted a champion of the other party, who has evinced a strong inclination to get up a branch fight on her own account. ('Hooroar,' ejaculates a pot-boy in parenthesis, 'put the kyebosk[sic, possibly a typo for kyebosh][1] on her, Mary!)
  3. (slang, dated) Fashion; style.
    • 1902, George Ade, Breaking into Society, "Rugged Hiram and Hiram's Giddy Wife":
      She was, in very Sooth, among the highest of the Rollers, but Hiram stood for the Bills with nary a Whimper. He was proud to be the Husband of the Lady Ki-Bosh of the Local Knickerbockers.

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

kibosh (third-person singular simple present kiboshes, present participle kiboshing, simple past and past participle kiboshed)

  1. (transitive) To decisively terminate.

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Anatoly Liberman, 'Three recent theories of “kibosh”' (OUP)
  2. ^ Gerald Cohen, Stephen Goranson, Matthew Little, Origin of Kibosh (Routledge Studies in Etymology, 2017) →ISBN; cited in Ben Zimmer "Putting the Kibosh on an Old Riddle: the Source of the Phrase" (The Wall Street Journal, 29 December 2017)
  3. ^ kurbash” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present.
  4. ^ (cf. William Safire, "Quoth the Maven: More on Language")