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See also: Kinn

Contents

HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

A lexicalized inflected form derived from ki (outside area (old Hungarian)) +‎ -n (case suffix).[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈkinː]
  • Hyphenation: kinn

AdverbEdit

kinn

  1. outside

Usage notesEdit

Never takes suffixes. Suffixes can be attached only to its synonym, kint (kintre, kintről, kinti).

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit


IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse kinn, from Proto-Germanic *kinnuz, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵénu- (cheek). Compare Faroese and Norwegian kinn, Danish and Swedish kind, German Kinn, Dutch kin, English chin.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

kinn f (genitive singular kinnar, nominative plural kinnar)

  1. a cheek
    • Luke 6:29 (English, Icelandic)
      Slái þig einhver á kinnina, skaltu og bjóða hina, og taki einhver yfirhöfn þína, skaltu ekki varna honum að taka kyrtilinn líka.
      If someone strikes you on one cheek, turn to him the other also. If someone takes your cloak, do not stop him from taking your tunic.

DeclensionEdit

See alsoEdit


NorwegianEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse kinn, from Proto-Germanic *kinnuz. Compare English chin.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

kinn n

  1. a cheek
    å vende det andre kinnet til - to turn the other cheek
  2. (in placenames): a steep hill(side) or slope

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old NorseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *kinnuz, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵénu- (cheek).

NounEdit

kinn f (genitive kinnar, plural kinnr)

  1. cheek

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

kinn in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press