Open main menu

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Dutch kloof (ravine) (South Africa).

NounEdit

kloof (plural kloofs)

  1. (South Africa) A deep glen or ravine.
    • 1901, William Thomas Black, The Fish River bush, South Africa, and its wild animals
      Forming the south boundary of the valley is a range of disrupted bushy hills, with intervening deep and rugged kloofs and ravines, which constituted the retreat of Jan Pockbaas and his rebel banditti.
    • 1948, Alan Paton, Cry, the Beloved Country, New York: Scribner, 1987, Chapter 1,
      The grass is rich and matted, you cannot see the soil. It holds the rain and the mist, and they seep into the ground, feeding the streams in every kloof.
    • 1978, André Brink, Rumours of Rain, Vintage 2000, p. 172:
      Occasionally the narrow dirt road rose above the mist on the slopes of the high round hills, from where one looked down on the silver clouds in the valleys and kloofs below, a magical, incredible sight.

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Dutch kloof.

NounEdit

kloof (plural klove)

  1. gap, split
  2. ravine, gorge, glen

Etymology 2Edit

From Dutch kloven.

VerbEdit

kloof (present kloof, present participle klovende, past participle gekloof)

  1. to split, to cleave

DutchEdit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kloːf/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -oːf

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch clove, see klieven.

NounEdit

kloof f (plural kloven, diminutive kloofje n)

  1. gap, gorge, ravine
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

VerbEdit

kloof

  1. first-person singular present indicative of kloven
  2. imperative of kloven

VerbEdit

kloof

  1. singular past indicative of klieven

VerbEdit

kloof

  1. singular past indicative of kluiven