See also: krååk

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From kraken (to crack; to squat; to break and enter). Cognate with English crack.

NounEdit

kraak m (plural kraken, diminutive kraakje n)

  1. An instance or action of cracking, breaking; in particular the activity of squatting premises.
  2. A robbery by breaking and entering.
SynonymsEdit
Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

kraak

  1. first-person singular present indicative of kraken
  2. imperative of kraken

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle Dutch crake, from Old French caraque, from Old Spanish carraca, Italian caracca or Medieval Latin carraca, from Latin carrus or Arabic قَرَاقِير‎(qarāqīr).

NounEdit

kraak f (plural kraken, diminutive kraakje n)

  1. (navigation) A carrack, a nau; a large, 16th/17th century, Iberian type of war - or commercial naval ship.
  2. A smaller Dutch type of wooden cargo ship, used for inland shipping from the late seventeenth to early nineteenth century.
Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Borrowed from Norwegian Bokmål krake.

NounEdit

kraak m (plural kraken, diminutive kraakje n)

  1. (zoology) kraken, giant octopus
  2. sea monster
  3. Alternative form of kraken
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

NounEdit

kraak m (plural kraken, diminutive kraakje n)

  1. A gallery in a barn or church
SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • M. J. Koenen & J. Endepols, Verklarend Handwoordenboek der Nederlandse Taal (tevens Vreemde-woordentolk), Groningen, Wolters-Noordhoff, 1969 (26th edition) [Dutch dictionary in Dutch]