TranslingualEdit

SymbolEdit

nau

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-2 & ISO 639-3 language code for Nauruan.

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

Portuguese nau. Doublet of nef and nave.

NounEdit

nau (plural naus)

  1. (historical) Synonym of carrack
    • 2008, Liam Matthew Brockey, Portuguese Colonial Cities in the Early Modern World[1]:
      Bentley Duncan has even suggested that it was the prospect of trade rather than the doubtful facilities of the dockyard that persuaded so many naus to stop at Mozambique Island.

AnagramsEdit


AragoneseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin nāvem.

NounEdit

nau f (plural naus)

  1. ship

ReferencesEdit


BasqueEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

nau

  1. Third-person singular (hark), taking first-person singular (ni) as direct object, present indicative form of izan.

Usage notesEdit

Linguistically, this verb form can be seen as belonging to the reconstructed citation form edun instead of izan.


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Catalan nau, from Latin nāvem, from Proto-Indo-European *néh₂us.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nau f (plural naus)

  1. ship
    Hypernym: vaixell
  2. (architecture) nave
    nau lateral(please add an English translation of this usage example)
  3. industrial building

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Portuguese: nau, nao
    • English: nau
  • Spanish: nao

Further readingEdit


ChuukeseEdit

NounEdit

nau

  1. son

Crimean TatarEdit

PronounEdit

nau

  1. that

Fiji HindiEdit

NumeralEdit

nau

  1. nine

ReferencesEdit


KabuverdianuEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Portuguese não.

AdverbEdit

nau

  1. no

LashiEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

nau

  1. to want

ReferencesEdit

  • Hkaw Luk (2017) A grammatical sketch of Lacid[2], Chiang Mai: Payap University (master thesis)

OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin nāvis, nāvem.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nau f (plural naus)

  1. ship, vessel, watercraft

Old IrishEdit

NounEdit

nau f

  1. Archaic form of

Pennsylvania GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Compare German nun, Dutch nu, English now.

AdverbEdit

nau

  1. now

PortugueseEdit

 
Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt
 
nau

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Catalan nau, from Latin nāvis.[1][2] Compare Spanish nao. Doublet of nave.

PronunciationEdit

  • Rhymes: -aw
  • Hyphenation: nau

NounEdit

nau f (plural naus)

  1. a three or four-masted sailing ship used all along the 15th century and early 16th
  2. vessel
  3. carrack

DescendantsEdit

  • English: nau

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ nau” in Dicionário infopédia da Língua Portuguesa. Porto: Porto Editora, 2003–2022.
  2. ^ nau” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

SudovianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Balto-Slavic *náwjas, from Proto-Indo-European *néwyos. Compare Lithuanian naũjas, Old Prussian nauns, however Latvian jaûns.[1][2]

AdjectiveEdit

nau

  1. new
    Antonym: ſenſ (old)

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Zigmas Zinkevičius (1985), “Lenkų-jotvingių žodynėlis? [A Polish-Yotvingian dictionary?]”, in Baltistica (in Lithuanian), volume 21, issue 1, page 77: “nau ‘naujas, l. nowy’ 192.”
  2. ^ naũjas” in Hock et al., Altlitauisches etymologisches Wörterbuch 2.0 (online, 2020–): “nar. nau adj. ‘neu’”.

TahitianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

nau

  1. some

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Tok PisinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English now.

AdverbEdit

nau

  1. now
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VietnameseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From an infixed form (with *-rn-) of Proto-Vietic ancestor of Vietnamese đau (to be aching, sore, hurt, in pain; to be sick, ill (Northern)).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nau ()

  1. (obsolete) pain
    • 1495-1997, Tao Đàn nhị thập bát tú (Twenty Mansions of Tao Đàn), Hồng Đức Quốc Âm thi tập (Collection of Poem in the Nation's Language), folio 69b
      唯唯隊郡𦛌𦚐
      Dói dói đòi nau quặn ruột rà.
      Sharp and keen are the guts' many twistings and writhings.
    • 18th century, Đặng Trần Côn, Chinh phụ ngâm (Lament of the Soldier's Wife); Vietnamese translation by Đoàn Thị Điểm, lines 333-334; English translation based on Huỳnh Sanh Thông's version.
      Thiết một thân phòng không luống giữ,
      Thời tiết lành nhầm nhỡ đòi nau.
      Pitiful is the lonely wife inside an empty room who lets her finest seasons [endure] much haphazard agony.
    • 1820, Nguyễn Du (阮攸), Truyện Kiều (傳翹) [The Tale of Kieu], Liễu Văn Ðường edition, published 1866, lines 1129-1130:
      Hoá nhi thật có nỡ lòng,
      Làm chi giày tía vò hồng lắm nau!
      Oh how pitiless you are, Creator!
      Why stamp on this rosy and purple flower which already had much pain in her heart? / Why inflict on this rosy and purple flower so much pain?
  2. (obsolete) birth pang