croak

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Middle English croken, back-formation from Old English cracettan, cræccettan, from Proto-Germanic *krāk- (compare Swedish kråka, German krächzen), from Proto-Indo-European *greh₂-k- (compare Latin grāculus ‘jackdaw’, Serbo-Croatian grákati).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

croak (plural croaks)

  1. A faint, harsh sound made in the throat.
  2. The cry of a frog or toad. (see also ribbit)

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbEdit

croak (third-person singular simple present croaks, present participle croaking, simple past and past participle croaked)

  1. (intransitive) To make a croak.
  2. (transitive) To utter in a low, hoarse voice.
    • Shakespeare
      The raven himself is hoarse, / That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan.
  3. (intransitive, of a frog) To make its cry.
  4. (intransitive, of a raven) To make its cry.
  5. (slang) To die.
  6. (transitive, slang) To kill someone or something.
    He'd seen my face, so I had to croak him.
  7. To complain; especially, to grumble; to forebode evil; to utter complaints or forebodings habitually.
    • Carlyle
      Marat [] croaks with reasonableness.

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.
Last modified on 7 April 2014, at 22:58