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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Latin carrus

NounEdit

carrus (plural carri)

  1. (uncommon, historical) A load: various English units of weight or volume based upon standardized cartloads of certain commodities.

SynonymsEdit

HyponymsEdit


LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Gaulish karros, from Proto-Celtic *karros (wagon), from Proto-Indo-European *kr̥s-o-, zero-grade form of *ḱers- (to run). Doublet of currus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

carrus m (genitive carrī); second declension

  1. a wagon, a four-wheeled baggage cart
  2. a cartload, a wagonload
  3. (Medieval) a load, an English unit of weight
    • c. 1300, Tractatus de Ponderibus et Mensuris
      Saccus lane debet ponderare viginti & octo petras & solebat ponderare unam summam frumenti & ponderat sextam partem unius carri de plumbo
      The sack of wool ought to weigh twenty & eight stone & is accustomed to weigh one quarter of wheat & weights the sixth part of one cartload of lead.

InflectionEdit

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative carrus carrī
genitive carrī carrōrum
dative carrō carrīs
accusative carrum carrōs
ablative carrō carrīs
vocative carre carrī

SynonymsEdit

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • carrus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • carrus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “carrus”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • carrus” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • carrus in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • carrus in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin