See also: Lemur, lémur, lèmur, and lemúr

English

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Ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta)

Etymology

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From Latin lemurēs (spirits of the dead). The name was originally given to the red slender loris (then Lemur tardigradus) in 1754 by Carl Linnaeus. According to Linnaeus, the name was selected because of the nocturnal activity and slow movements of the red slender loris. In 1758, Linnaeus added, among others, the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) to the genus Lemur. All other species, including the red slender loris, were eventually moved to other genera. In time, the word became the colloquial name for all primates endemic to Madagascar.[1]

Pronunciation

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Noun

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lemur (plural lemurs)

  1. (colloquial) Any strepsirrhine primate of the infraorder Lemuriformes, superfamily Lemuroidea, native only to Madagascar and some surrounding islands.
  2. Any of the genus Lemur, represented by the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta).
  3. (obsolete) A loris (Lemur tardigradus, now Loris tardigradus), predating the 10th edition of Systema Naturæ.

Usage notes

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The taxonomy is currently disputed, see   Taxonomy of lemurs on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Derived terms

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terms derived from lemur (noun)
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Translations

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References

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  1. ^ A. R. Dunkel with J. S. Zijlstra and C. P. Groves (2011-2012) “Giant Rabbits, Marmosets, and British Comedies: Etymology of Lemur Names, Part 1”, in Lemur News[1], volume 16, archived from the original on 6 November 2016, pages 64–70.

Czech

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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lemur m anim

  1. lemur

Declension

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This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Derived terms

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Further reading

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  • lemur”, in Příruční slovník jazyka českého (in Czech), 1935-1957
  • lemur”, in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého (in Czech), 1960–1971, 1989

Icelandic

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Verb

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lemur (weak)

  1. second-person singular present indicative of lemja
  2. third-person singular present indicative of lemja

Polish

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Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl
 
lemur

Etymology

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Internationalism; compare English lemur, French lémur, German Lemur, ultimately from Latin lemurēs.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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lemur m animal

  1. lemur (any primate of the infraorder Lemuriformes)
  2. (Roman mythology) lemures (spirit or ghost of the dead, considered as malignant)

Declension

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Further reading

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  • lemur in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • lemur in Polish dictionaries at PWN
  • lemury in PWN's encyclopedia

Romanian

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Etymology

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Borrowed from French lémure.

Noun

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lemur m (plural lemuri)

  1. lemur

Declension

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Serbo-Croatian

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /lěmuːr/
  • Hyphenation: le‧mur

Noun

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lèmūr m (Cyrillic spelling лѐмӯр)

  1. lemur

Declension

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Swedish

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Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sv

Etymology

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Learned borrowing from Latin lemures (spirits). First attested in 1861.[1]

Pronunciation

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Noun

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lemur c

  1. (animal) a lemur [since 1912][2]
  2. (Roman mythology) a lemures [since 1861][1]
    Synonyms: ande, spöke, gast

Declension

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Declension of lemur 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative lemur lemuren lemurer lemurerna
Genitive lemurs lemurens lemurers lemurernas

See also

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References

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Anagrams

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Tagalog

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Spanish lémur or English lemur, from Latin lemurēs (spirits of the dead).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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lemur (Baybayin spelling ᜎᜒᜋᜓᜇ᜔)

  1. lemur