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See also: Gast and gäst

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English gasten, from Old English gǣstan, from Proto-Germanic *gaistijaną. Also spelled ghast due to association with ghost.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

gast (third-person singular simple present gasts, present participle gasting, simple past and past participle gasted)

  1. (obsolete) To frighten.
    • Geoffrey Chaucer, The House of Fame
      And be not so a-gast, for shame!
    • William Shakespeare, King Lear
      Or whether gasted by the noise I made, full suddenly he fled.

AnagramsEdit


BretonEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

NounEdit

gast f (plural gasted)

  1. (vulgar, derogatory) whore, bitch

InflectionEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɣɑst/, /xɑst/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɑst

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Dutch *gast, from Proto-Germanic *gastiz.

NounEdit

gast m (plural gasten, diminutive gastje n)

  1. guest
    Ik heb afgelopen week wat familie te gast gehad.Some family members stayed with me as guests last week.
  2. (chiefly in combinations) knave, worker, apprentice, delivery boy
  3. (colloquial) dude, guy
    Synonym: gozer
    Die gast is echt niet goed bij z'n hoofd.That guy really isn't right in the head.
    Zijn broer is best een aardige gast.His brother is quite a nice guy.
    Gast, waar heb je het nou helemaal over?Dude, what are you even on about?
SynonymsEdit
AntonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

gast

  1. second- and third-person singular present indicative of gassen
  2. (archaic) plural imperative of gassen

GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

gast

  1. Romanization of 𐌲𐌰𐍃𐍄

Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From West Germanic *gaist (“spirit”), from Proto-Germanic *gaistaz. Cognate with Old Frisian jēst (West Frisian geast), Old Saxon gēst (Low German Geest), Old Dutch geist (Dutch geest), Old High German geist (German Geist). Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰeysd-, *ǵʰisd- (anger, agitation).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɡɑːst/, [ɣɑːst] (early Old English)
  • IPA(key): /ɡɑːst/, [ɡɑːst] (late Old English)

NounEdit

gāst m

  1. spirit
    se Hālga Gāst
    the Holy Spirit
    Iċ bēo mid þē on gāste.
    I'll be with you in spirit.
    Ǣr hīe trēow forċeorfaþ, hīe biddaþ þæs trēowes gāst forġiefnesse.
    Before they cut down a tree, they ask the spirit of the tree for forgiveness.
  2. ghost
    Hwȳ habbaþ gāstas clāðas on? Iċ mǣne, hwȳ ne sind hīe ealle nacode?
    Why do ghosts have clothes on? I mean, why aren't they all naked?
  3. breath

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

gast m (oblique plural gaz or gatz, nominative singular gaz or gatz, nominative plural gast)

  1. destruction

AdjectiveEdit

gast m (oblique and nominative feminine singular gaste)

  1. destroyed; ravaged; decimated

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *gastiz (whence also Old Norse gestr), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰóstis; cognate with Latin hostis (enemy).

NounEdit

gast m (plural gesti)

  1. guest

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *gastiz, whence also Old English ġiest.

NounEdit

gast m

  1. guest

DeclensionEdit


DescendantsEdit

  • Middle Low German: gast
    • Westphalian:
      Ravensbergisch-Lippisch: Gast
      Sauerländisch: Gast
      Westmünsterländisch: Gast
    • Plautdietsch: Gaust
    • West Frisian: gast

SwedishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

gast c

  1. A crew member on a ship

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

gast c

  1. (dated or poetic, dialectal) A ghost

DeclensionEdit

Declension of gast 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative gast gasten gastar gastarna
Genitive gasts gastens gastars gastarnas

WelshEdit

NounEdit

gast f (plural geist)

  1. (vulgar, derogatory) bitch

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
gast ast ngast unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.