liepa

See also: liepā

LatvianEdit

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 Liepa on Latvian Wikipedia

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Liepa

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Balto-Slavic *leipāˀ[1], from Proto-Indo-European *leyp- (to glue, to paste), whence also lipt (to stick, to adhere). Reflexes of the non-diphthongized stem can be seen in place names like Līpes kalns or Lipaiķi. The name probably came from the soft, pleasant leaves of this tree (or perhaps because of its sticky sap). A different name for the linden tree, from Proto-Indo-European *lento-, can be seen in English linden, German Linden, and is reflected in Latvian lieta (thing) (q.v.). Cognates include Lithuanian líepa, Old Prussian lipe ([liːpe]?), *leipe (from place names like Leypein, Leypiten), Proto-Slavic *lipa (Russian, Ukrainian липа (lípa), Belarusian ліпа (lípa), Bulgarian липа (lipá), Czech lípa, Polish lipa). (There were apparently also Germanic cognates — later replaced by reflexes of *lento- — , as in the city name Leipciga, today's Leipzig.)[2]

PronunciationEdit

(file)

NounEdit

liepa f

  1. linden tree, lime tree (esp. Tillia cordata)
    kupla liepa — bushy linden tree
    liepu ziedilinden flowers
    liepu lūkilinden bark
    liepu (ziedu) tējalinden (flower) tea

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Ronald Kim (forth.), The phonology of Balto-Slavic, In: Handbook of Indo-European Studies, ed. M. Weiss & A. Garrett, OUP
  2. ^ “liepa” in Konstantīns Karulis (1992, 2001), Latviešu Etimoloģijas Vārdnīca (Rīga: AVOTS) ISBN: 9984-700-12-7.

LithuanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Balto-Slavic *leipāˀ. Compare Proto-Slavic *lipa.

NounEdit

liepa f

  1. linden tree, lime tree

NounEdit

liepa f

  1. July (seventh month of the Gregorian calendar)

See alsoEdit

Last modified on 17 April 2014, at 19:45