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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin quod videās,[1] or from quod vidē (literally which see),[2] from quod (the neuter of quī (what)) + vidē the imperative of videō (I see), or videās, the second-person present subjunctive of the same verb.

AdverbEdit

q.v. (not comparable)

  1. quod vide (plural quae vide); which see; used to reference material mentioned in text.
    This is described in more detail in Brown’s book on the subject (q.v.).
Alternative formsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin quantum (as much as) + vīs (you want, you wish), the second person singular active indicative form of volo (I want, I wish).

AdverbEdit

q.v. (not comparable)

  1. (in prescriptions) as much as you wish

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ 1851, E. A. Andrews, A copious and critical Latin-English Lexicon:, founded on the larger Latin-German Lexicon of Dr. William Freund, New York, ("Other Abbreviations, Signs, etc."): "q. v., quod videas."
  2. ^ 1835, Thomas Morell, An Abridgment of Ainsworth's Dictionary English and Latin, designed for the Use of Schools, Philadelphia ("An Explication of the several Marks used in this Work."): "q. v. for quod vide, or see the word referred to."

LatinEdit

AbbreviationEdit

q.v.

  1. quod vidē (which see)