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EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

mander (third-person singular simple present manders, present participle mandering, simple past and past participle mandered)

  1. Alternative form of maunder

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for mander in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

AnagramsEdit


EstonianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Finnic *manta. Cognate to Finnish manner, Finnish mantere, Veps mandreh.

NounEdit

mander (genitive mandri, partitive mandrit)

  1. Alternative form of manner.

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

Itkonen, Erkki; Kulonen, Ulla-Maija, editors (1992–2000) Suomen sanojen alkuperä [The origin of Finnish words] (in Finnish), Helsinki: Institute for the Languages of Finland/Finnish Literature Society, →ISBN


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French mander, from Latin mandāre, present active infinitive of mandō.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

mander

  1. (obsolete) to command, summon
  2. (formal, transitive) to inform, to send news of

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


LadinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mandāre, present active infinitive of mandō.

VerbEdit

mander

  1. to send, dispatch

ConjugationEdit

  • Ladin conjugation varies from one region to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.

Related termsEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

mander

  1. first-person singular present passive subjunctive of mandō

MòchenoEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mander

  1. plural of mònn

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mandāre, present active infinitive of mandō.

VerbEdit

mander

  1. to command; to order (give a command)

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. The forms that would normally end in *-d, *-ds, *-dt are modified to t, z, t. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • French: mander