maximus

See also: Maximus

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Italic *magisəmos, from Proto-Indo-European *méǵh₂s (great).

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈmak.si.mus/, [ˈmäks̠ɪmʊs̠]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈmak.si.mus/, [ˈmɑksimus]
  • (file)
  • Note: the only evidence for a long /a/ in this word is the inscriptional MÁX(IMVS) in CIL 6.2080.17[1] (the acts of the Arval Brethren for 120 CE). If genuine, this would be an example of the much-debated Lachmann's law.[2]

AdjectiveEdit

maximus (feminine maxima, neuter maximum, positive magnus); first/second declension

  1. greatest (in various senses):
    1. (of size) biggest, largest
      Antonyms: minimus, tenuissimus
    2. (of number, value, amount) largest
      1. (of sound) loudest
      2. (law, of property) unencumbered
        uti optimae maximaeque sunt (aedēs)the building is free from any encumberance
    3. (of age) oldest, eldest
      maximus nātūthe eldest
    4. (of degree) highest, utmost
      maximō opereextremely, vehemently, with the greatest intensity
    5. (of things) most important, chief, leading, critical
      maximī facereto value greatly, make much of
    6. (of power or reputation) mightiest, most eminent, senior or distinguished
      annālēs maximīthe annals compiled by the Pontifex Maximus
    7. (with agent nouns) outstanding (denoting excellence in a special activity)
    8. (of mind, spirit) most confident, bravest; most generous

DeclensionEdit

First/second-declension adjective.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
Nominative maximus maxima maximum maximī maximae maxima
Genitive maximī maximae maximī maximōrum maximārum maximōrum
Dative maximō maximō maximīs
Accusative maximum maximam maximum maximōs maximās maxima
Ablative maximō maximā maximō maximīs
Vocative maxime maxima maximum maximī maximae maxima

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ “CIL 6.2080 – Fragments of the Acta of the Arval Brothers (Arvales fratres)”, in Center for Epigraphical and Palaeographical Studies[1], 2017-02-23
  2. ^ Weiss, Michael L. (2009) Outline of the Historical and Comparative Grammar of Latin[2], Ann Arbor: Beech Stave Press, →ISBN, page 175

Further readingEdit

  • maximus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • maximus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • maximus in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[3], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • it is high time that..: tempus maximum est, ut
    • to be in the enjoyment of a large fortune: fortunis maximis ornatum esse
    • to remunerate (handsomely): praemiis (amplissimis, maximis) aliquem afficere
    • to praise, extol, commend a person: (maximis, summis) laudibus efferre aliquem or aliquid
    • to win golden opinions from every one: maximam ab omnibus laudem adipisci
    • to be overwhelmed by a great affliction: in maximos luctus incidere
    • time assuages the most violent grief: vel maximos luctus vetustate tollit diuturnitas (Fam. 5. 16. 5)
    • to inspire some one with the most brilliant hopes: in maximam spem aliquem adducere (Att. 2. 22. 3)
    • to be reduced to extreme financial embarrassment: in maximas angustias (pecuniae) adduci
    • a numerous army: ingens, maximus exercitus (not numerosus)
    • to procure a very large supply of corn: frumenti vim maximam comparare
    • by the longest possible forced marches: quam maximis itineribus (potest)
    • the main point: id quod maximum, gravissimum est
  • maximus in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers