Contents

GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese meigo, from Latin magicus ‎(magical), from Ancient Greek μαγικός ‎(magikós).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

meigo m (feminine singular meiga, masculine plural meigos, feminine plural meigas)

  1. bewitching, seductive

NounEdit

meigo m ‎(plural meigos, feminine meiga, feminine plural meigas)

  1. a wizard, a witch doctor
    • 2013, David D. Vázquez Álvarez, Ninguén nace antetempo, Baía Edicións, page 103:
      —as palabras do meigo unha vez máis non deixaban lugar a dúbidas—.
      —once again, the wizard’s words left no room for doubt.
  2. a person who is believed to have made a pact with the devil.
    • 1991, Ramón Otero Pedrayo, A romaría de Xelmírez, Editorial Galaxia, page 143
      De aí xurdiu posteriormente a lenda de que fora un meigo que fixera pauto co demo para obte-las sedes de Reims, Ravena e Roma.
      From there, a legend later appeared stating that he was a warlock who made a pact with the devil in order to obtain the seats of Reims, Ravenna and Rome.

Usage notesEdit

Some people make a distinction between meigo ‎(someone who makes potions, herbal cures, enchantments, etc.) and bruxo ‎(someone who has made a pact with the devil).

DescendantsEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese meigo, from Latin magicus ‎(magical), from Ancient Greek μαγικός ‎(magikós).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

meigo m ‎(feminine singular meiga, masculine plural meigos, feminine plural meigas, comparable)

  1. sweet, lovely
  2. caring, gentle

InflectionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Galician meigo, from Old Portuguese meigo, from Latin magicus ‎(magical), from Ancient Greek μαγικός ‎(magikós).

NounEdit

meigo m ‎(plural meigos)

  1. (NW Spain) A person who is believed to have made a pact with the devil.
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