EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English suave, borrowed from Latin suāvis (sweet, pleasant); doublet of sweet.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • (UK) IPA(key): /swɑːv/
  • (US) IPA(key): /swɑv/, /sweɪv/
  • Rhymes: -ɑːv, -eɪv

AdjectiveEdit

suave (comparative suaver, superlative suavest)

  1. Charming, confident and elegant.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

suave (plural suaves)

  1. Sweet talk.

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Paternoster, Lewis M. and Frager-Stone, Ruth. Three Dimensions of Vocabulary Growth. Second Edition. Amsco School Publications: USA. 1998.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French suave, from Latin suāvis (sweet, pleasant), replacing the inherited souef, from Old French soef, suef (sweet, mild, agreeable, tranquil, peaceful), which was supplanted in form and meaning during the 17th cent. together with its derivatives, and survives only in the dialects.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

suave (plural suaves)

  1. (especially of persons and their speech) smooth and graceful, polite, polished, suave

ReferencesEdit


ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /suˈa.ve/, [s̪uˈäːve̞], (in fast speech) /ˈswa.ve/, [ˈs̪wäːve̞]
  • Rhymes: -ave
  • Hyphenation: su‧à‧ve

AdjectiveEdit

suave (plural suavi)

  1. (literary) Archaic form of soave.
    • 1567, Ricettario fiorentino [Florentine Cookbook]‎[1], page 5:
      L'ACQVA buona debbe eſſere limpida, pura, e netta da ogni altra coſa; mancare di tutte le qualità come odore, ſapore, e colore; eſſere ſuaue al guſto.
      Good water should be transparent, pure, and clear of any other things; [it should] lack qualities such as smell, taste, and color; [it should] be delicate when tasted.

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • suave in Dizionario Italiano Olivetti

LatinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Adverbial use of the neuter singular adjective.

PronunciationEdit

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈsu̯aː.u̯e/, [ˈs̠u̯äːu̯ɛ]
  • (Classical) IPA(key): /suˈaː.u̯e/, [s̠uˈäːu̯ɛ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /suˈa.ve/, [suˈɑːvɛ]
  • Note: the v is found scanned as either a vowel or a consonant, with Romance descendants typically reflecting the former.

AdverbEdit

suāve (not comparable)

  1. sweetly, becomingly, pleasantly
    Synonym: suāviter

Etymology 2Edit

AdjectiveEdit

suāve

  1. nominative/accusative/vocative neuter singular of suāvis

ReferencesEdit

  • suave in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • suave in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin suāvis (sweet, pleasant).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

suave m or f (plural suaves, comparable)

  1. soft, smooth
    Synonyms: macio, liso
  2. gentle, mild
  3. (Brazil, slang) fine, okay

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin suāvis (sweet, pleasant).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

suave (plural suaves)

  1. smooth, soft, fluffy
    Antonym: áspero
    piel suavesoft (or smooth) skin
    textura suavesoft (or smooth) texture
  2. soft, gentle, light, mild (e.g. mild flavor, a mild winter)
    aterrizaje suavesoft landing
    viento suavegentle wind
    un toque suavea gentle (or soft or light) touch
  3. suave (charming, confident and elegant)
    Synonyms: terso, blando, liso
    Antonyms: áspero, duro
  4. cool, acceptable, easy

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit