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Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French suave, from Latin suāvis (sweet).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

suave (comparative suaver, superlative suavest)

  1. Charming, confident and elegant.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

suave (plural suaves)

  1. Sweet talk.

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Paternoster, Lewis M. and Frager-Stone, Ruth. Three Dimensions of Vocabulary Growth. Second Edition. Amsco School Publications: USA. 1998.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French suave, a borrowing from Latin suāvis (sweet). Displaced Old French soef, which was inherited.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

suave (plural suaves)

  1. smooth, suave

ReferencesEdit


ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

suave (masculine and feminine plural suavi)

  1. variant of soave

Derived termsEdit


LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

suāve

  1. nominative neuter singular of suāvis
  2. accusative neuter singular of suāvis
  3. vocative neuter singular of suāvis

AdverbEdit

suāve

  1. sweetly, agreeably, pleasantly

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • suave in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • suave in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin suavis (sweet), from Proto-Italic *swādwis (sweet), from Proto-Indo-European *sweh₂dus (sweet).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

suave m, f (plural suaves, comparable)

  1. soft, smooth
  2. gentle, mild
  3. (Brazil, slang) fine, okay

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin suāvis (sweet).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈswabe/, [ˈswaβe]

AdjectiveEdit

suave (plural suaves)

  1. soft, smooth
  2. suave (charming, confident and elegant)
    Synonyms: terso, blando, liso
    Antonyms: áspero, duro
  3. cool, acceptable, easy

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit