misanthrope

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek from μισέω (miséō, I hate) and ἄνθρωπος (ánthrōpos, man; human); compare miser.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈmɪs.ənˌθɹəʊp/, /ˈmɪz.ənˌθɹəʊp/
  • (file)
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈmɪs.ənˌθɹoʊp/, /ˈmɪz.ənˌθɹoʊp/
  • Rhymes: -əʊp

NounEdit

misanthrope (plural misanthropes)

  1. One who hates all mankind; one who hates the human race.
    • 1731, Jonathan Swift, "On the Death of Jonathan Swift":
      Alas, poor Dean! his only scope
      Was to be held a misanthrope.
    • 1834, Letitia Elizabeth Landon, Francesca Carrara, volume 1, page 50:
      I cannot love evergreens—they are the misanthropes of nature. To them the spring brings no promise, the autumn no decline; they are cut off from the sweetest of all ties with their kind—sympathy.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

 
French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek μισάνθρωπος (misánthrōpos), from μισέω (miséō, I hate) and ἄνθρωπος (ánthrōpos, man; human).

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • (file)

NounEdit

misanthrope m or f (plural misanthropes)

  1. misanthrope, misanthropist

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit