English edit

Etymology edit

mis- +‎ begotten

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

misbegotten (comparative more misbegotten, superlative most misbegotten)

  1. (of a person) Born out of wedlock; illegitimate.
  2. (by extension, figuratively) Ill-conceived.
    • 2012 March 22, Scott Tobias, “Cabin Boy”, in The A.V. Club:
      Many of the strangest, most misbegotten studio films of the last 20 years have been comedies, perhaps because middle-aged executives have no comprehension of what the younger generation finds funny.
  3. (by extension) Bad; worthless.
    • 1886 January 5, Robert Louis Stevenson, Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, London: Longmans, Green, and Co., →OCLC:
      Rather, as there was something abnormal and misbegotten in the very essence of the creature that now faced me—something seizing, surprising and revolting—this fresh disparity seemed but to fit in with and to reinforce it; []
    • 1930, Norman Lindsay, Redheap, Sydney, N.S.W.: Ure Smith, published 1965, →OCLC, page 82:
      "Do they not sneakingly bestow on me their crass inability to do anything with their own misbegotten progeny, a subterfuge which I scornfully fub off on text-books?"
    • 1994, Elizabeth Wurtzel, Prozac Nation: Young and Depressed in America, Houghton Mifflin, →ISBN, page 5:
      There was the guy I spent a misbegotten night with who said he'd call me and never did but came to the party anyway, and I felt primed for a confrontation.

Translations edit

Verb edit

misbegotten

  1. past participle of misbeget

Noun edit

misbegotten (plural misbegotten)

  1. (obsolete, sometimes derogatory) One born illegitimately (i.e., out of wedlock); a bastard.
  2. (loosely, in the plural) A person born into infelicitous circumstances.
    • 1973, Philippa Foot, “Nietzsche: The Revaluation of Values”, in Robert C. Solomon, Garden City, New York, editors, Nietzsche: A Collection of Critical Essays, Anchor Books, →ISBN, page 161:
      By preserving the incapable and “misbegotten”, and by insisting that they be the object of compassionate attention, it would cause even the strong to be infected with gloom and nihilism.

Translations edit

See also edit

References edit