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See also: Born, börn, and børn

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English born, boren (often shortened bore), from Old English boren, past participle of beran (bear, carry, bring forth).

VerbEdit

born

  1. past participle of bear; given birth to, birthed.
  2. (obsolete) past participle of bear in other senses.
    • Geddes
      In some monasteries the severity of the clausure is hard to be born.
TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

born (not comparable)

  1. Having from birth (or as if from birth) a certain quality or character; innate; inherited.
    • 1701 January (indicated as 1700), [Daniel Defoe], The True-Born Englishman. A Satyr, [London: s.n.], OCLC 606597370, part II, page 61:
      I'll make it out, deny it he that can, / His Worship is a True-born Engliſhman, / In all the Latitude that Empty Word / By Modern Acceptation's understood.
    • 1942, Storm Jameson, Then we shall hear singing: a fantasy in C major
      I ought really to have called him my sergeant. He's a born sergeant. That's as much as to say he's a born scoundrel.
HyponymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Dialectal variant of burn.

NounEdit

born (plural borns)

  1. (Geordie) Alternative spelling of burn (a stream)
ReferencesEdit
  • The New Geordie Dictionary, Frank Graham, 1987, →ISBN

VerbEdit

born (third-person singular simple present borns, present participle bornin, simple past and past participle bornt)

  1. (Geordie) Alternative spelling of burn (with fire etc.)
ReferencesEdit
  • Newcastle 1970s, Scott Dobson and Dick Irwin, [1]

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

NounEdit

born f (plural bornen)

  1. (dialectal) Obsolete form of bron.

Norwegian NynorskEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

born n

  1. indefinite plural of barn