moisture

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English moisture, from Old French moistour (moisture, dampness, wetness). Compare French moiteur.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

 
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moisture (usually uncountable, plural moistures)

  1. That which moistens or makes damp or wet; exuding fluid; liquid in small quantity.
    drops / beads of moisture
  2. The state of being moist.
    Synonyms: dampness, humidity, wetness
    • 1631, Francis [Bacon], “4. Century.”, in Sylua Syluarum: Or A Naturall Historie. In Ten Centuries. [], 3rd edition, London: [] VVilliam Rawley; [p]rinted by J[ohn] H[aviland] for William Lee [], page 84, OCLC 1044372886:
      [] all Exclusion of Open Aire, (which is euer Predatory) maintaineth the Body in his first Freshnesse, and Moisture:
    • 1643, John Denham, Coopers Hill, p. 7,[2]
      Such was the discord, which did first disperse
      Forme, order, beauty through the universe;
      While drynesse moisture, coldnesse heat resists,
      All that we have, and that we are subsists:
    • 1794, Erasmus Darwin, Zoonomia, London: J. Johnson, Volume 1, Section 7, I.1, p. 39,[3]
      [The organs of touch are excited] by the unceasing variations of the heat, moisture, and pressure of the atmosphere;
  3. (medicine) Skin moisture noted as dry, moist, clammy, or diaphoretic as part of the skin signs assessment.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old French moistour; equivalent to moiste +‎ -ure.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɔi̯stiu̯r(ə)/, /ˈmɔi̯stur(ə)/, /ˈmɔi̯stər(ə)/

NounEdit

moisture

  1. moistness, wetness
  2. moisture, humidity
  3. fluid, secretion
  4. (figuratively) Something invigorating.

Usage notesEdit

SynonymsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: moisture

ReferencesEdit