See also: nombré

AragoneseEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

nombre m (plural nombres)

  1. name

ReferencesEdit


AsturianEdit

VerbEdit

nombre

  1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive of nombrar

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan nombre, from Latin numerus, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *nem- (to assign, allot; take).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nombre m (plural nombres)

  1. number, quantity

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

 
French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

EtymologyEdit

From Old French nombre, nonbre, from Latin numerus, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *nem- (to assign, allot; take). Doublet of numéro.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /nɔ̃bʁ/
  • (file)

NounEdit

nombre m (plural nombres)

  1. number

Usage notesEdit

The word nombre refers to a quantity or a mathematical concept, e.g. a number of items in a set, real numbers, complex numbers, etc., while its doublet numéro refers to a label made of digits, e.g. a rank, a jersey number, a phone number or a winning lottery number.

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


LadinoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Spanish nomne, nomre, from a Vulgar Latin *nōmine, from Latin nōmen,, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁nómn̥.

NounEdit

nombre m (Latin spelling)

  1. name

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Anglo-Norman noumbre and Old French nonbre, from Latin numerus (which some forms are influenced by).

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈnumbər/, /ˈnuːmbər/, /ˈnumbrə/, /ˈnuːmər/

NounEdit

nombre (plural nombres)

  1. A number; an entity used to describe quantity:
    1. A digit; a physical representation of a number.
    2. A counting; an enumeration or a figuring of a quantity.
  2. A set, group, or bunch; a quantity:
    1. The totality of a group; the entirety of a group.
    2. A large group; a multitude or bevy.
  3. A shape; a geometrical construction.
  4. Arithmetic; mathematics; the study of numbers.
  5. The concept of number in grammar.
  6. (rare) A list or an enumeration of items.
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • English: number (see there for further descendants)
  • Scots: nummer
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

nombre

  1. Alternative form of noumbren

OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan nombre, from Latin numerus, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *nem- (to assign, allot; take).

NounEdit

nombre m (plural nombres)

  1. number, quantity

Related termsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

nombre m (oblique plural nombres, nominative singular nombres, nominative plural nombre)

  1. Alternative form of nonbre

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Spanish nomne, nomre, from a Vulgar Latin *nōmine, from Latin nōmen,[1], from Proto-Indo-European *h₁nómn̥. Compare English noun.

NounEdit

nombre m (plural nombres)

  1. name
    Hyponym: apellido
    ¿Cuál es tu nombre?What is your name?
    Mi nombre es ‘Carlos’.My name is ‘Carlos’.
  2. (grammar) noun
Usage notesEdit

In Spanish, it is more common to use llamarse (to be called) to indicate someone’s name:

¿Cómo te llamas?What is your name? (literally, “What do you call yourself?”)
Me llamo Carlos.My name is Carlos. (literally, “I call myself Carlos.”)
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

nombre

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of nombrar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of nombrar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of nombrar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of nombrar.

ReferencesEdit

Further readingEdit