See also: Patent

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈpeɪtənt/, /ˈpætənt/
  • (US) enPR: pătʹənt, IPA(key): /ˈpætənt/, [pʰæ̝ʔn̩t] or enPR: pātʹənt, IPA(key): /ˈpeɪtənt/, [pʰe̞ɪʔn̩t]
  • (file)

Etymology 1Edit

Short form of Anglo-Norman lettre patente (open letter), from Latin littera patens.

NounEdit

patent (plural patents)

  1. A declaration issued by a government agency declaring someone the inventor of a new invention and having the privilege of stopping others from making, using or selling the claimed invention; a letter patent.
    • 2013 June 8, “Obama goes troll-hunting”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8839, page 55:
      The solitary, lumbering trolls of Scandinavian mythology would sometimes be turned to stone by exposure to sunlight. Barack Obama is hoping that several measures announced on June 4th will have a similarly paralysing effect on their modern incarnation, the patent troll.
  2. A specific grant of ownership of a piece of property; a land patent.
  3. License; formal permission.
    • 1603, William Shakespeare, Othello, Act IV, sc. 1:
      If you are so fond over her iniquity, give her patent
      to offend, for if it touch not you, it comes near
      nobody.
  4. Patent leather: a varnished, high-gloss leather typically used for shoes and accessories.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

patent (third-person singular simple present patents, present participle patenting, simple past and past participle patented)

  1. To successfully register an invention with a government agency; to secure a letter patent.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle French patent, from Old French [Term?], from Latin patēns (open, lying open), present participle of pateō (I lie open).

AdjectiveEdit

patent (comparative more patent, superlative most patent)

  1. (biology) Open, unobstructed, expanded.
    That is a patent ductus arteriosus.
  2. Explicit and obvious.
    Those claims are patent nonsense.
  3. (of flour) That is fine, and consists mostly of the inner part of the endosperm.
  4. Open; unconcealed; conspicuous.
    • (Can we date this quote by Motley and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      He had received instructions, both patent and secret.
  5. Open to public perusal; said of a document conferring some right or privilege.
    letters patent
  6. Protected by a legal patent.
    a patent right; patent medicines
    • (Can we date this quote by Mortimer and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      Madder [] in King Charles the First's time, was made a patent commodity.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

patent m (plural patents)

  1. patent

CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

patent m

  1. patent (declaration issued by a government to an inventor)

Derived termsEdit


DanishEdit

NounEdit

patent n (singular definite patentet, plural indefinite patenter)

  1. patent

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


DutchEdit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Middle French patente, from lettres patentes (letter in which a privilege is granted), from Latin litterae patentes.

NounEdit

patent n (plural patenten, diminutive patentje n)

  1. patent [from 16th c.]
    Synonym: octrooi
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from German patent, originating in student slang. Related to etymology 1.

AdjectiveEdit

patent (comparative patenter, superlative patentst)

  1. excellent, exquisite [from mid 19th c.]
    Synonyms: geweldig, voortreffelijk
InflectionEdit
Inflection of patent
uninflected patent
inflected patente
comparative patenter
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial patent patenter het patentst
het patentste
indefinite m./f. sing. patente patentere patentste
n. sing. patent patenter patentste
plural patente patentere patentste
definite patente patentere patentste
partitive patents patenters

GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

patent (comparative patenter, superlative am patentesten)

  1. clever
  2. ingenious

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

patent

  1. third-person plural present active indicative of pateō

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

Short form of Anglo-Norman lettre patente.

NounEdit

patent n (definite singular patentet, indefinite plural patent or patenter, definite plural patenta or patentene)

  1. patent

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

Short form of Anglo-Norman lettre patente.

NounEdit

patent n (definite singular patentet, indefinite plural patent, definite plural patenta)

  1. patent

ReferencesEdit


PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

patent m inan

  1. patent (official declaration that someone is the inventor of something)

DeclensionEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

 
Serbo-Croatian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sh

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /pǎtent/
  • Hyphenation: pa‧tent

NounEdit

pàtent m (Cyrillic spelling па̀тент)

  1. patent (official declaration that someone is the inventor of something)

DeclensionEdit


SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

patent n

  1. patent

DeclensionEdit

Declension of patent 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative patent patentet patent patenten
Genitive patents patentets patents patentens

Related termsEdit