outskirt

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

out- +‎ skirt

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

outskirt (plural outskirts)

  1. A more remote part of a town or city; the periphery, environs; a suburb.
    Many people commute into the business district from the outskirts of town.
    • 2010, J. L. Bourne, Beyond Exile: Day by Day Armageddon, page 37:
      I told her of my plan to take John into an urban outskirt area for the purpose of retrieving some vital technical manuals.
    • 1983, Our Barrios: Past, Present, and Future, page 20:
      The outskirt communities were originally established as labor camps for railroad workers, farm and ranch hands.
    • 1917, Michigan Film Review, page 347:
      Hal Smith, manager of the Ferry Field theatre, Detroit, one of the largest and prettiest outskirt houses in town, played Metro's "Revelation" for three days last week

Usage notesEdit

  • As a noun, plural form is much more common.
  • In attributive use, the singular form is more common.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

outskirt (third-person singular simple present outskirts, present participle outskirting, simple past and past participle outskirted)

  1. (transitive) To surround as an outskirt.