remote

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English, from Old French remot, masculine, remote, feminine, from Latin remotus, past participle of removere (to remove), from re- + movere (to move).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

remote (comparative remoter, superlative remotest)

  1. At a distance; disconnected.
    A remote operator may control the vehicle with a wireless handset.
  2. Distant or otherwise inaccessible.
    After his fall from the emperor's favor, the general was posted to a remote outpost.
  3. Unlikely.
    There was only a remote possibility that we would be rescued as we were far outside of the regular shipping lanes.
  4. Emotionally detached.
    After her mother's death, my friend grew remote for a time while she dealt with her grief.

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NounEdit

remote (plural remotes)

  1. Short for remote control.
    I hate it when my uncle comes over to visit; he always sits in the best chair and hogs the remote.
  2. (broadcasting) An element of broadcast programming originating away from the station's or show's control room.

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VerbEdit

remote (third-person singular simple present remotes, present participle remoting, simple past and past participle remoted)

  1. (computing) To connect to a computer from a remote location.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Bill English, Microsoft Sharepoint 2010: Administrator's Companion:
      These requirements are applicable whether you are remoting into a server or locally executing SharePoint cmdlets.

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ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [reˈmɔː.t̪e], /reˈmɔte/

AdjectiveEdit

remote f plural

  1. feminine plural of remoto

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LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

remōte

  1. vocative masculine singular of remōtus
Last modified on 17 April 2014, at 17:23