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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the Latin passim (here and there, everywhere).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpæsɪm/
  • (file)

AdverbEdit

passim (not comparable)

  1. throughout or frequently
  2. here and there

Usage notesEdit

Used especially in citations, often with simply the name of a book or writer, to indicate that something (as a word, phrase, or idea) is to be found at many places throughout the section, book, or writings of the author cited.

QuotationsEdit

  • 1751David Hume, An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals
    The sceptics assert [Sext. Emp. adrersus Math. lib. viii.], though absurdly, that the origin of all religious worship was derived from the utility of inanimate objects, as the sun and moon, to the support and well-being of mankind. This is also the common reason assigned by historians, for the deification of eminent heroes and legislators [Diod. Sic. passim.].
  • 1978Supreme Court of the United States, F.C.C. v. Pacifica Foundation
    See also Hearings on H.R.8825 before the House Committee on the Merchant Marine and Fisheries, 70th Cong., 1st Sess., passim (1928).

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From passus (spread out), from pandō (I spread).

AdverbEdit

passim (not comparable)

  1. everywhere (almost synonymous to ubique)
  2. here and there, hither and thither; (at or to different places)

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit