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See also: temeré

Contents

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin timēre, present active infinitive of timeō.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

temere

  1. to fear
  2. to beware

ConjugationEdit

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Italic *temezi (in darkness, blindly), a fossilised locative form of Proto-Indo-European *témHos (darkness), from *temH- (dark). Cognate with Sanskrit तमस् (támas), Persian تم(tam), Latin tenebrae (darkness).

AdverbEdit

temere (not comparable)

  1. by chance, by accident, at random
  2. without design, intent, or purpose
  3. casually, fortuitously, rashly, heedlessly, thoughtlessly, inconsiderately, indiscreetly, idly

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • temere in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • temere in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • temere in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • quite accidentally, fortuitously: temere et fortuito; forte (et) temere
    • without reflection; inconsiderately; rashly: nullo consilio, nulla ratione, temere
    • to act reasonably, judiciously: prudenter, considerate, consilio agere (opp. temere, nullo consilio, nulla ratione)
    • to have no principles: omnia temere agere, nullo iudicio uti

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

teme +‎ -re

NounEdit

temere f (plural temeri)

  1. fear
  2. faintheartedness

SynonymsEdit