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See also: Tol, tól, țol, tol', -tól, and -től

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Back slang for lot.

NounEdit

tol (plural tols)

  1. (obsolete, costermongers) Lot
    • 1851, Mayhew, Henry, “Habits and Amusements of Costermongers”, in London Labour and the London Poor[1], volume 1, page 11:
      Business topics are discussed in a most peculiar style. One man takes the pipe from his mouth and says, "Bill made a doogheno hit this morning." "Jem," says another, to a man just entering, "you'll stand a top o' reeb?" "On," answers Jem, "I've had a trosseno tol, and have been doing dab."
    • 1978, Ayers, Rose, The Street Sparrows:
      "Give me two gen, then, and take the whole bloody tol. I've walked me teef orf afore rouf this mornin', and wot 'ave I got? Two bloody yenneps! I ask yer."

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From a contraction of the determiner tou (all) + masculine singular article el (the).

ContractionEdit

tol m (feminine tola, neuter tolo, masculine plural tolos, feminine plural toles)

  1. all the

BariaiEdit

NumeralEdit

tol

  1. three

ReferencesEdit


CatalanEdit

VerbEdit

tol

  1. third-person singular present indicative form of toldre
  2. second-person singular imperative form of toldre

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch tol (twig), related to telg.

NounEdit

tol m (plural tollen, diminutive tolletje n)

  1. top, spinning top (a toy)

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle Dutch tol, from Old Dutch tol, from Latin telōneum (custom house).

NounEdit

tol m (plural tollen)

  1. toll, customs (money)

AnagramsEdit


FaroeseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse þol.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tol n (genitive singular tols, uncountable)

  1. patience

DeclensionEdit

Declension of tol (singular only)
n3s singular
indefinite definite
nominative tol tolið
accusative tol tolið
dative toli tolinum
genitive tols tolsins

AntonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Unknown origin.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

tol

  1. (transitive) to push

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit


LithuanianEdit

PrepositionEdit

tol

  1. until

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English toll.

NounEdit

tol

  1. Alternative form of toll (toll)

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English tōl.

NounEdit

tol

  1. Alternative form of tool (tool)

MòchenoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German tal, from Proto-Germanic *dalą.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tol n (plural telder)

  1. valley (elongated depression between hills or mountains)

ReferencesEdit

  • Anthony R. Rowley, Liacht as de sproch: Grammatica della lingua mòchena Deutsch-Fersentalerisch, TEMI, 2003.

Norwegian NynorskEdit

VerbEdit

tol

  1. imperative of tola and tole

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *tōlą, from Proto-Indo-European *dewh₂- (to tie to; secure).

NounEdit

tōl n

  1. tool, implement, instrument

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From *dulaz, whence also Old English dol.

AdjectiveEdit

tol

  1. foolish