passion

See also: Passion

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English passioun, passion, from Old French passion (and in part from Old English passion), from Latin passio (suffering), noun of action from perfect passive participle passus (suffered), from deponent verb patior (I suffer), from Proto-Indo-European *peh₁- (to hurt), see also Old English fēond (devil, enemy), Gothic 𐍆𐌰𐌹𐌰𐌽 (faian, to blame).

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: păsh'ən, IPA(key): /ˈpæʃən/
  • (US) IPA(key): [ˈpʰæʃən]
    (file)
  • Rhymes: -æʃən

NounEdit

passion (countable and uncountable, plural passions)

  1. Any great, strong, powerful emotion, especially romantic love or extreme hate.
    We share a passion for books.
    • 2011 January 16, Saj Chowdhury, “Sunderland 1 – 1 Newcastle”, in BBC Sport[1], archived from the original on 7 December 2019:
      That was partly because of a swirling wind that made precision passing difficult and also a derby atmosphere where the emphasis seemed to be on passion rather than football.
  2. Fervor, determination.
  3. An object of passionate or romantic love or strong romantic interest.
    It started as a hobby, but now my motorbike collection has become my passion.
  4. Sexual intercourse, especially when very emotional.
    We shared a night of passion.
  5. (Christianity, usually capitalized) The suffering of Jesus leading up to and during his crucifixion.
    • 1543 June 8, Henry VIII of England, “The Nynthe Article. The Holy Catholike Churche.”, in A Necessary Doctrine and Erudicion for Any Chrysten Man, Set furth by the Kynges Maiestye of Englande, &c., imprinted at London:  [] by Thomas Berthelet, [], OCLC 1126428435:
      Moreouer the perfit beleue of this article, worketh in all true chriſten people, aloue to continue in this vnitie, and afeare to be caſte out of the ſame, and it worketh in them that be ſinners and repentant, great comforte, and conſolacion, to obteine remiſſion of ſinne, by vertue of Chriſtes paſſion, and adminiſtracion of his ſacramentes at the miniſters handes, ordained for that purpoſe, [...]
  6. A display, musical composition, or play meant to commemorate the suffering of Jesus.
  7. (obsolete) Suffering or enduring of imposed or inflicted pain; any suffering or distress.
    a cardiac passion
  8. (obsolete) The state of being acted upon; subjection to an external agent or influence; a passive condition
    Antonym: action
  9. (obsolete) The capacity of being affected by external agents; susceptibility of impressions from external agents.
    • 1631, Francis [Bacon], “IX. Century. [Experiment Solitary Touching Other Passions of Matter, and Characters of Bodies.]”, in Sylua Syluarum: Or A Naturall Historie. In Ten Centuries. [], 3rd edition, London: [] VVilliam Rawley; [p]rinted by J[ohn] H[aviland] for William Lee [], paragraph 846, page 216, OCLC 1044372886:
      The Differences of Impreſsible and Not Impreſsible; Figurable and Not Figurable; Mouldable and Not Mouldable; Sciſsile and Not Sciſsile; And many other Paſsions of Matter, are Plebeian Notions, applied vnto the Inſtruments and Vſes which Men ordinarily practiſe; [...]
  10. (obsolete) An innate attribute, property, or quality of a thing.
    [...] to obtain the knowledge of some passion of the circle.
  11. (obsolete) Disorder of the mind; madness.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

VerbEdit

passion (third-person singular simple present passions, present participle passioning, simple past and past participle passioned)

  1. (obsolete) To suffer pain or sorrow; to experience a passion; to be extremely agitated.
  2. (transitive) To give a passionate character to.

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


FinnishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpɑsːion/, [ˈpɑs̠ːio̞n]
  • Rhymes: -ɑsːion
  • Syllabification: pas‧si‧on

NounEdit

passion

  1. Genitive singular form of passio.

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French passion, from Old French passion, borrowed from Latin passiō, ultimately from patior. Cognate with patience.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

passion f (plural passions)

  1. (countable and uncountable) passion

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

passion

  1. Alternative form of passioun

Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French passion.

NounEdit

passion f (plural passions)

  1. passion

DescendantsEdit

  • French: passion

Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin passio (suffering), noun of action from perfect passive participle passus (suffered), from deponent verb pati (suffer).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

passion f (nominative plural passione)

  1. passion of Christ
    • ðaet Eghwilc messepriost gesinge fore Osuulfes sawle twa messan, twa fore Beornðryðe sawle; and aeghwilc diacon arede twa passione fore his sawle, twa for hire;that Every mass-priest recites for Oswulf's soul two masses, two for Beornthryth's soul; and every deacon reads two passions for his soul. (Oswulf's Charters, c805)

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin passio, passionem.

NounEdit

passion f (oblique plural passions, nominative singular passion, nominative plural passions)

  1. passion (suffering)
    1. (specifically, Christianity) the ordeal endured by Jesus in order to absolve humanity of sin

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit