See also: Pavo

EsperantoEdit

 
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Pavo.

EtymologyEdit

From Latin pāvō and Yiddish פּאַווע(pave), from Old High German pfāwo, from Proto-Germanic *pāwô (itself from Latin pāvō).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpa.vo/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: pa‧vo

NounEdit

pavo (accusative singular pavon, plural pavoj, accusative plural pavojn)

  1. peacock
    • 1926, L. L. Zamenhof, Fabeloj de Andersen, translation of original by Hans Christian Andersen, ch. 14:
      En la herbo apude staris amaso da pavoj kun etenditaj radiantaj vostoj.
      In the grass a group of peacocks with extended, radiant tails stood next to one another.

HyponymsEdit

HolonymsEdit

  • pavaro (flock of peacocks (peafowls))

GalicianEdit

 
un pavo (a turkey)

EtymologyEdit

From Latin pāvō.

NounEdit

pavo m (plural pavos)

  1. turkey

Related termsEdit


LatinEdit

 
pāvō

EtymologyEdit

Likely borrowed from Ancient Greek ταώς (taṓs, peacock), or possibly imitative (compare Latin paupulō (to call like a peacock).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pāvō m (genitive pāvōnis); third declension

  1. peacock, peafowl; a bird associated with Argus and sacred to Hera; eaten as a delicacy.

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative pāvō pāvōnēs
Genitive pāvōnis pāvōnum
Dative pāvōnī pāvōnibus
Accusative pāvōnem pāvōnēs
Ablative pāvōne pāvōnibus
Vocative pāvō pāvōnēs

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin pāvō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pavo m (plural pavos)

  1. turkey
  2. peacock
  3. (slang) buck (dollar)
  4. (slang) euro
  5. (slang) moron, airhead, dummy, dope (dumb man)

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit