See also: pa'u and Pau

Translingual edit

Symbol edit

pau

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-2 & ISO 639-3 language code for Palauan.

English edit

Etymology 1 edit

Noun edit

pau (plural paus)

  1. Alternative form of pa (Maori fort)

Etymology 2 edit

From Hawaiian Pidgin English pau, from Hawaiian pau (done, finished).

Adjective edit

pau (not comparable)

  1. (Hawaii) done; over; finished
    • 1946, Armine Von Tempski, Bright Spurs, page 122:
      I had never known any haoles except Elmer and Marks and they were ice cold affairs. Everyone was always glad when their twice-a-month visit was pau. The very island seemed to sigh with relief []
    • 2004, Mike Ashman, Kauaʻi Historical Society, Kauai as it was in the 1940s and '50s:
      When the county truck was pau hauling rubbish for the day, []

Etymology 3 edit

Noun edit

pau

  1. (historical) A unit of volume used in Brunei, Malaysia, Sabah, and Sarawak, equivalent to 2 imperial gills (approximately 0.284 litres or 0.6 US pints).

Etymology 4 edit

Borrowed from Chinese .

Noun edit

pau

  1. (Malaysia and Singapore) baozi; Chinese steamed buns with filling

See also edit

Anagrams edit

'Are'are edit

Noun edit

pau

  1. head

References edit

Catalan edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Old Catalan pau, from Latin pācem, from Proto-Indo-European *peh₂ǵ-. Compare Occitan patz, French paix, Spanish paz.

Noun edit

pau f (plural paus)

  1. peace
Derived terms edit
Related terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun edit

pau m (plural paus)

  1. spotted dragonet (a fish of the species Callionymus maculatus)
    Synonyms: aferrapedres m, aferra-roques m

Etymology 3 edit

Uncertain. Sometimes ascribed to Paul, but also as a phonetic reduction of *paup, alternating form of palp (the act of feeling).

Adjective edit

pau (feminine pava, masculine plural paus, feminine plural paves)

  1. credulous; gullable; rustic

Noun edit

pau m (plural paus)

  1. fool; rube

References edit

Galician edit

Etymology edit

From Old Galician-Portuguese pao, from Latin pālus (stake), from Proto-Italic *pākslos, from Proto-Indo-European *peh₂ǵ-slos, from *peh₂ǵ- (attach). Compare Portuguese pau and Spanish palo.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

pau m (plural paus)

  1. stick
    Synonym: vara
    • 1370, R. Lorenzo, editor, Crónica troiana, A Coruña: Fundación Barrié, page 605:
      [Et] poserõ perlos muros beesteyros et arque[yro]s muytos et outros, pera deytar quantos et paos agudos metudos en ferros, en guisa que os que se quisesem chegar ao muro nõ podesem escapar de morte
      And they arranged many crossbowmen and bowmen on the walls, to throw stones and sharp sticks inserted in irons, so as the ones who wanted to came near the wall could not escape the death
  2. (uncountable) wood (material)
    Synonyms: fuste, madeira
    • 1457, F. R. Tato Plaza, editor, Libro de notas de Álvaro Pérez, notario da Terra de Rianxo e Postmarcos. Santiago: Concello da Cultura Galega (Ponencia de Lingua), page 171:
      Tres ballestas: J de aseyro, IJ de pao
      Three crossbows: one of steel, two of wood
    • 1700, Domingo Blanco, editor, A Poesía popular en Galicia, Vigo: Serais, page 124:
      Santo San Bras de Viana feito de pau de amieiro
      Saint Saint [sic] Blaise of Viana, carved in alder wood
  3. blow
    Synonyms: golpe, pancada

Derived terms edit

References edit

  • pao” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006–2022.
  • pao” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006–2018.
  • pau” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006–2013.
  • pau” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • pau” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Hawaiian edit

Etymology edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpau̯/, [ˈpɐw], [ˈpɔw] (rapid speech)

Verb edit

pau

  1. (stative) finished, done
  2. (stative) destroyed
  3. (idiomatic) all
    E aloha i nā hoa a pau.
    Greet all the friends.

Hawaiian Creole edit

Etymology edit

From Hawaiian pau (finished).

Verb edit

pau

  1. done, finished
    You pau awready?
    Are you done already?

Limos Kalinga edit

Noun edit

pau

  1. mango

Portuguese edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old Galician-Portuguese pao, from Latin pālus (stake),[1][2] from Proto-Italic *pākslos, from Proto-Indo-European *peh₂ǵ-slos, from *peh₂ǵ-. Compare Galician pau, Asturian palu, and Spanish palo.

Pronunciation edit

  • Rhymes: -aw
  • Hyphenation: pau
  • (file)

Noun edit

pau m (plural paus)

  1. stick
  2. wood
  3. (figuratively, slang, vulgar) penis, dick, cock, prick
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:pénis
  4. singular of paus (clubs) (one of the four suits of playing cards)
  5. (slang) a unit of currency
    Isso custou uns 500 paus.That cost about 500 bucks.

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Guinea-Bissau Creole: po
  • Kabuverdianu:
  • Swahili: pao, pau

References edit

Swahili edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

pau (n class, plural pau)

  1. Alternative form of pao

See also edit

Suits in Swahili · ng'anda (see also: karata, karata za kucheza) (layout · text)
       
makopa uru shupaza, majembe pao, pau, karanga, mavi ya mbuzi

Welsh edit

Etymology edit

From Latin pāgus (district, province).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

pau f (plural peuoedd)

  1. (archaic) land, nation

Synonyms edit

Mutation edit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
pau bau mhau phau
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

West Frisian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin pāvō (peacock).

Noun edit

pau c (plural pauwen, diminutive pauke)

  1. peacock

Further reading edit

  • pau (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011