See also: Perron

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French pierre (stone), from Anglo-Norman perron.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈpɛɹən/, /ˈpɛɹɒ̃/

NounEdit

perron (plural perrons)

  1. (historical) A stone block used as the base of a monument, marker, etc.
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, “ij”, in Le Morte Darthur, book X:
      hit wille be no worship for you to haue adoo with me / for ye are fressh and I am wounded sore / And therfor and ye wille nedes haue ado with me / Assigne me a day and thenne I shal mete with you withoute fayle / ye saye wel said sir Tristram / Now I assigne you to mete me in the medowe by the ryuer of Camelot / where Merlyon sette the peron
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
  2. (architecture) A platform outside the raised entrance to a church or large building, or the steps leading to such a platform. US: stoop.

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

NounEdit

perron

  1. platform (A raised structure from which passengers can enter or leave a train)

DeclensionEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from German Perron, from French perron, from Middle French perron, from Old French [Term?].

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /pɛˈrɔn/, /pəˈrɔn/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: per‧ron
  • Rhymes: -ɔn

NounEdit

perron n (plural perrons, diminutive perronnetje n)

  1. A boarding platform on which passengers wait for a train: it is next to a spoor.

DescendantsEdit

  • Afrikaans: perron
  • Indonesian: peron
  • Sranan Tongo: peron

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From pierre +‎ -on.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /pɛ.ʁɔ̃/, /pe.ʁɔ̃/
  • (file)

NounEdit

perron m (plural perrons)

  1. steps (to an entranceway), perron, stoop (US)

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

NounEdit

perron m (plural perrons)

  1. perron (stone block used as the base of a monument, marker, etc.)
    • 1552, François Rabelais, Le Tiers Livre:
      Ces parolles dictes, se retira en sa tesniere, & sus le perron de la porte se recoursa robe, cotte, & chemise iusques aux escelles, & leurs monstroit son cul.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

p(i)erre (stone) +‎ -on.

NounEdit

perron m (oblique plural perrons, nominative singular perrons, nominative plural perron)

  1. block of stone

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit