See also: Spoor

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium. Particularly: “Any dates and refs for this?”) From Afrikaans spoor, from Dutch spoor, akin to Old English and Old Norse spor (whence Danish spor), and German Spur, all from Proto-Germanic *spurą. Compare spurn.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

spoor (usually uncountable, plural spoors)

  1. The track, trail, droppings or scent of an animal
    • 1912, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Lost World[1]:
      We all stopped to examine that monstrous spoor. If it were indeed a bird - and what animal could leave such a mark? - its foot was so much larger than an ostrich's that its height upon the same scale must be enormous.
    • 1918, Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Land That Time Forgot Chapter VIII
      Even poor Nobs appeared dejected as we quit the compound and set out upon the well-marked spoor of the abductor.
    • 1971, William S. Burroughs, The Wild Boys: A Book of the Dead, page 10
      Now he has picked up the spoor of drunken vomit and there is the doll sprawled against a wall, his pants streaked with urine.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

spoor (third-person singular simple present spoors, present participle spooring, simple past and past participle spoored)

  1. (transitive) To track an animal by following its spoor

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch spor, from Old Dutch *spor, from Proto-Germanic *spurą, from Proto-Indo-European *sperH-.

NounEdit

spoor n (plural sporen, diminutive spoortje n)

  1. track
  2. railway track
  3. trace
  4. spoor
  5. lead, trail, clue
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Afrikaans: spoor
  • Jersey Dutch: spôr
  • Negerhollands: spoor
  • Petjo: sepoor
  • Indonesian: sepur (railway track)
  • Javanese: sepur
    • Indonesian: sepur (train)
  • Papiamentu: spor

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle Dutch spore, from Old Dutch *sporo from Proto-Germanic *spurô, from Proto-Indo-European *sperH-.

NounEdit

spoor f (plural sporen, diminutive spoortje n)

  1. spur
  2. spore
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

spoor

  1. Alternative form of spore