platform

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Recorded since 1550, from Middle French plate-forme, literally "flat form", from Middle French plate "flat" (from Old French plat, from Ancient Greek πλατύς ‎(platús, flat)) + forme "form" (from Latin forma). Compare flatscape.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • \ˈplat-ˌfȯrm\

NounEdit

platform ‎(plural platforms)

  1. A raised stage from which speeches are made and on which musical and other performances are made.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 13, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      “[…] They talk of you as if you were Croesus—and I expect the beggars sponge on you unconscionably.” And Vickers launched forth into a tirade very different from his platform utterances. He spoke with extreme contempt of the dense stupidity exhibited on all occasions by the working classes.
  2. A place or an opportunity to express one's opinion, a tribune.
    This new talk show will give a platform to everyday men and women.
  3. A kind of high shoe with an extra layer between the inner and outer soles.
  4. (figuratively) Something that allows an enterprise to advance; a foundation or stage.
    • 2012 September 7, Phil McNulty, “Moldova 0-5 England”, in BBC Sport[1]:
      Hodgson may actually feel England could have scored even more but this was the perfect first step on the road to Rio in 2014 and the ideal platform for the second qualifier against Ukraine at Wembley on Tuesday.
  5. (automotive) A set of components shared by several vehicle models.
  6. (computing) A particular type of operating system or environment such as a database or other specific software, and/or a particular type of computer or microprocessor, used to describe a particular environment for running other software, or for defining a specific software or hardware environment for discussion purposes.
    • 2013 June 1, “End of the peer show”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8838, page 71:
      Finance is seldom romantic. But the idea of peer-to-peer lending comes close. This is an industry that brings together individual savers and lenders on online platforms. Those that want to borrow are matched with those that want to lend.
    That program runs on the X Window System platform.
  7. (politics) A political stance on a broad set of issues, which are called planks.
  8. (travel) A raised structure from which passengers can enter or leave a train, metro etc.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 5, in The Celebrity:
      We expressed our readiness, and in ten minutes were in the station wagon, rolling rapidly down the long drive, for it was then after nine. [] As we reached the lodge we heard the whistle, and we backed up against one side of the platform as the train pulled up at the other.
    • 2013 June 1, “Ideas coming down the track”, in The Economist[2], volume 407, number 8838, page 13 (Technology Quarterly):
      A “moving platform” scheme [] is more technologically ambitious than maglev trains even though it relies on conventional rails. Local trains would use side-by-side rails to roll alongside intercity trains and allow passengers to switch trains by stepping through docking bays. This set-up solves several problems […]. Stopping high-speed trains wastes energy and time, so why not simply slow them down enough for a moving platform to pull alongside?
  9. (obsolete) A plan; a sketch; a model; a pattern.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)
  10. (nautical) A light deck, usually placed in a section of the hold or over the floor of the magazine.
  11. A flat expanse of rock often as a result of wave erosion.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbEdit

platform ‎(third-person singular simple present platforms, present participle platforming, simple past and past participle platformed)

  1. (transitive) To furnish with or shape into a platform
    • 1885, Frances Elliot, The Diary of an Idle Woman in Sicily[3], page 192:
      [] upon a smiling knoll platformed by Nature []
  2. (transitive) To place on a platform.
  3. (obsolete, transitive) To form a plan of; to model; to lay out.
    Church discipline is platformed in the Bible. — Milton.
  4. (politics, transitive) To include in a political platform
    • 1955, Amy Lowell, Complete Poetical Works[4], page 408:
      Among them I scarcely can plot out one truth / Plain enough to be platformed by some voting sleuth / And paraded before the precinct polling-booth.

See alsoEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: plat‧form

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French plate-forme.

NounEdit

platform n ‎(plural platformen or platforms, diminutive platformpje n)

  1. A platform, flat surface, notably a dais or stage
  2. A political platform, (electoral) program
  3. A plateau
  4. A flat roof
  5. (obsolete) A ground-plan

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From German Plattform, from French plate-forme.[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈplɒtform]
  • Hyphenation: plat‧form

NounEdit

platform ‎(plural platformok)

  1. (politics) platform (electoral program)
  2. (computing) platform (a particular type of operating system or environment)
  3. platform (a flat surface)

DeclensionEdit

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative platform platformok
accusative platformot platformokat
dative platformnak platformoknak
instrumental platformmal platformokkal
causal-final platformért platformokért
translative platformmá platformokká
terminative platformig platformokig
essive-formal platformként platformokként
essive-modal
inessive platformban platformokban
superessive platformon platformokon
adessive platformnál platformoknál
illative platformba platformokba
sublative platformra platformokra
allative platformhoz platformokhoz
elative platformból platformokból
delative platformról platformokról
ablative platformtól platformoktól
Possessive forms of platform
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. platformom platformjaim
2nd person sing. platformod platformjaid
3rd person sing. platformja platformjai
1st person plural platformunk platformjaink
2nd person plural platformotok platformjaitok
3rd person plural platformjuk platformjaik

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Tótfalusi István, Idegenszó-tár: Idegen szavak értelmező és etimológiai szótára. Tinta Könyvkiadó, Budapest, 2005, ISBN 963 7094 20 2

TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from French plate-forme.

NounEdit

platform ‎(definite accusative platformu, plural platformlar)

  1. platform
  2. (transport, travel) platform

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

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