pervious

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin pervius.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

pervious (comparative more pervious, superlative most pervious)

  1. Admitting passage; capable of being penetrated by another body or substance; permeable.
    a pervious soil
    • 1715, Alexander Pope, The Temple of Fame:
      [Doors] [] pervious to winds, and open every way.
  2. Accepting of new ideas.
  3. Capable of being penetrated, or seen through, by physical or mental vision.
    • 1660, Jeremy Taylor, The Worthy Communicant; or a Discourse of the Nature, Effects, and Blessings consequent to the worthy receiving of the Lords Supper
      God, whose secrets are pervious to no eye.
  4. (obsolete) Capable of penetrating or pervading.
    • 1718, Mat[thew] Prior, “Solomon on the Vanity of the World. A Poem in Three Books.”, in Poems on Several Occasions, London: [] Jacob Tonson [], and John Barber [], OCLC 5634253, (please specify the page):
      What is this little , agile , pervious fire [] ?
  5. (zoology) open; perforate, as applied to the nostrils of birds

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