See also: mentál

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɛn.təl/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛntəl

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowing from Middle French mental, from Late Latin mentālis, from mēns (mind, disposition; heart, soul) +‎ -ālis (-al, adjectival suffix).

AdjectiveEdit

mental (comparative more mental, superlative most mental)

  1. (relational) Of or relating to the mind or specifically the total emotional and intellectual response of an individual to external reality.
    1. Of or relating to intellectual as contrasted with emotional activity.
      mental acuity
    2. Of, relating to, or being intellectual as contrasted with overt physical activity.
      • 2013 July 19, Ian Sample, “Irregular bedtimes may affect children's brains”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 6, page 34:
        Irregular bedtimes may disrupt healthy brain development in young children, according to a study of intelligence and sleeping habits.  ¶ Going to bed at a different time each night affected girls more than boys, but both fared worse on mental tasks than children who had a set bedtime, researchers found.
    3. Occurring or experienced in the mind.
      • 1907 August, Robert W[illiam] Chambers, “The Unexpected”, in The Younger Set, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 24962326, page 240:
        I don't mean all of your friends—only a small proportion—which, however, connects your circle with that deadly, idle, brainless bunch—the insolent chatterers at the opera, [], the neurotic victims of mental cirrhosis, the jewelled animals whose moral code is the code of the barnyard—!
      Synonym: inner
    4. Relating to the mind, its activity, or its products as an object of study.
      mental science
      Synonym: ideological
    5. Relating to spirit or idea as opposed to matter.
      the distinction between physical things and mental ideas
  2. Of, relating to, or affected by a psychiatric disorder.
    a mental patient
    1. (relational) Intended for the care or treatment of persons affected by psychiatric disorders.
      mental hospitals
    2. (colloquial, Britain, dated in the US, comparable) Mentally disordered; insane, mad, crazy.
      He is the most mental freshman I've seen yet.
      He went mental on us.
  3. (colloquial, Britain, comparable) Enjoyable or fun, especially in a frenetic way.
    That was a mental party last night.
  4. Of or relating to telepathic or mind-reading powers.
    mental telepathy
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

c. 1727, from Latin mentum (the chin) +‎ -al.

AdjectiveEdit

mental (not comparable)

  1. (anatomy, relational) Of or relating to the chin or median part of the lower jaw, genial.
    Synonyms: genial, genian
    the mental nerve, the mental region
  2. (biology, relational) Of or relating to the chinlike or liplike structure.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

mental (plural mentals)

  1. (zootomy) A plate or scale covering the mentum or chin of a fish or reptile.

ReferencesEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin mentālis from Latin mēns; equivalent to mente +‎ -al.

AdjectiveEdit

mental (epicene, plural mentales)

  1. mental

Related termsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin mentālis, from Latin mēns; equivalent to ment +‎ -al.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mental (masculine and feminine plural mentals)

  1. mental

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


CebuanoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Clipping of English mental hospital.

NounEdit

mental

  1. mental hospital.

VerbEdit

mental

  1. to send or commit to a mental hospital

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin mentālis (of the mind, mental), from Latin mēns.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mental (feminine singular mentale, masculine plural mentaux, feminine plural mentales)

  1. mental (relating to the mind)

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

mental m (uncountable)

  1. mind
    Elle a un mental d'acier.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin mentālis, from Latin mēns; equivalent to mente +‎ -al.

AdjectiveEdit

mental m or f (plural mentais)

  1. mental

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin mentālis.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mental (not comparable)

  1. mental

DeclensionEdit


IndonesianEdit

 
Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

Etymology 1Edit

From Dutch mentaal, from Middle French mental, from Late Latin mentālis (of the mind, mental), from Latin mēns (the mind).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈmɛntal]
  • Hyphenation: mèn‧tal

AdjectiveEdit

mental

  1. mental: of or relating to the mind or an intellectual process.

NounEdit

mental

  1. mind.
    Synonyms: batin, watak

Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Betawi mental. Doublet of pental.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [mənˈtal]
  • Hyphenation: men‧tal

VerbEdit

mêntal

  1. to bounce off
    Synonyms: terpelanting, terpental
  2. to backfire

Etymology 3Edit

From Sundanese mental.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [mənˈtal]
  • Hyphenation: men‧tal

AdjectiveEdit

mêntal

  1. useless.

Further readingEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin mentalis, from mens.

AdjectiveEdit

mental (neuter singular mentalt, definite singular and plural mentale)

  1. mental

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin mentalis, from mens.

AdjectiveEdit

mental (neuter singular mentalt, definite singular and plural mentale)

  1. mental

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin mentālis, from Latin mēns; equivalent to mente +‎ -al.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mental m or f (plural mentais, comparable)

  1. mental

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


RomanianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mental m or n (feminine singular mentală, masculine plural mentali, feminine and neuter plural mentale)

  1. Alternative form of mintal

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin mentālis, from Latin mēns; equivalent to mente +‎ -al.

AdjectiveEdit

mental (plural mentales)

  1. mental

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin mentalis, from Latin mens.

AdjectiveEdit

mental

  1. mental, pertaining to the mind

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of mental
Indefinite Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular mental
Neuter singular mentalt
Plural mentala
Masculine plural3 mentale
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 mentale
All mentala
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in the predicative.
3) Dated or archaic

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


TagalogEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: men‧tal
  • IPA(key): /ˈmɛntal/, [ˈmɛntɐl]

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from English mental.

AdjectiveEdit

mental

  1. mental

Etymology 2Edit

Clipped form of English mental hospital.

NounEdit

mental

  1. mental hospital

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit