maniple

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the Middle English maniple, manyple, manaple, from the Old French maniple, manipule (manipule in Modern French), from the Latin manipulus (handful”, “troop of soldiers), from manus (hand) + the weakened root of pleō (I fill).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

maniple (plural maniples)

  1. (rare) A handful.
  2. A division of the Roman army numbering 60 or 120 men exclusive of officers, any small body of soldiers; a company.
  3. Originally, a napkin; later, an ornamental band or scarf worn upon the left arm as a part of the vestments of a priest in the Roman Catholic Church, and sometimes worn in the English Church service.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

  • Maniple (military unit) — Wikipedia
  • Maniple (vestment) — Wikipedia

AnagramsEdit

Last modified on 13 February 2014, at 13:40