See also: praną and prána

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Sanskrit प्राण (prāṇa, breath; life).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

prana (countable and uncountable, plural pranas)

  1. (Hinduism, yoga) Respiration, breathing, seen as a life principle or life force. [from 18th c.]
    • 1919, The Upanishads translated by Swami Paramananda:
      He it is who sends the (in-coming) Prana (life-breath) upward and throws the (out-going) breath downward.
    • 1919, The Upanishads translated by Swami Paramananda:
      He who knows Aditi, who rises with Prana (the Life Principle), existent in all the Devas.
    • 1919, The Upanishads translated by Swami Paramananda:
      May my limbs, speech, Prana (life-force), sight, hearing, strength and all my senses, gain in vigor.

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Sanskrit प्राण (prāṇa, breath, life).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpra.na/, [ˈpr̺äːn̺ä]
  • Hyphenation: prà‧na

NounEdit

prana m (invariable)

  1. prana

ReferencesEdit

  • prana in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Sanskrit प्राण (prāṇa).

NounEdit

prana f

  1. (Hinduism) prana
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

ParticipleEdit

prana

  1. feminine nominative/vocative singular of prany

Further readingEdit

  • prana in Polish dictionaries at PWN



SardinianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From earlier *plana, from Latin plāna.

NounEdit

prana

  1. plane (tool)

Serbo-CroatianEdit

ParticipleEdit

prana (Cyrillic spelling прана)

  1. inflection of prati:
    1. feminine singular passive past participle
    2. neuter plural passive past participle