prescriptive

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin praescriptivus (relating to a legal exception), from praescript- (directed in writing), from the verb praescribere.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /pɹɪˈskɹɪptɪv/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪptɪv
  • Hyphenation: pre‧scrip‧tive

AdjectiveEdit

prescriptive (comparative more prescriptive, superlative most prescriptive)

  1. Of or pertaining to prescribing or enjoining, especially an action or behavior based on a norm or standard.
    Synonym: normative
    Antonyms: descriptive (especially of grammar and usage), proscriptive, nonprescriptive
    • 1988, Andrew Radford, Transformational Grammar, Cambridge: University Press, →ISBN, page 8:
      For one thing, spoken language tends to be less subjected to prescriptive
      pressures than written language, and hence is a less artificial medium of com-
      munication (written language is often a kind of 'censored' version of spoken
      language). [...]

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

prescriptive

  1. feminine singular of prescriptif

RomanianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

prescriptive

  1. inflection of prescriptiv:
    1. feminine genitive/dative singular
    2. feminine/neuter plural